What We’re Reading: Week of March 23

Please add any articles or websites of interest to intellectual historians in the comments section! Here’s what caught our interest this week.

John:

Shirley May Banks, Interview with Trygve Throntveit on his book William James and the Quest for an Ethical Republic (New Books in History)

Lucie Campos (Lucy Garnier, trans.), “Geopolitics of Translation: Interview with Gisèle Sapiro” (Books and Ideas)

Nicolas Duvoux and Mathieu Trachman, « Les sciences sociales comme présence au monde : Entretien avec Didier Fassin » (La vie des idées)

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, »Warum wir unbedingt tanzen wollen, heute« (FAZ)

Dana Luciano, “The Inhuman Anthropocene” (LA Review of Books)

Erhard Schütz, »Ein Buch wie eine geladene Pistole« (Zeit)

Frances Stonor Saunders, “Stuck on the Flypaper” (LRB)

Judith Thurman, “A Loss for Words” (New Yorker)

Ingeborg Waldinger, »Die Kategorie des Sublimen« (NZZ)

Adam Zagajewski, »Bruderliebe, Bruderzwist« (Tagesspiegel)

And finally, free art books to download from the Metropolitan Museum of Art!

Emily:

Jessica Marie Johnson, Time, Space, and Memory at the Whitney Plantation (AAIHS)

Nathan K. Hensley, In this Dawn to be Alive: Versions of the “Postcritical,” 1999, 2015 (Arcade)

Timothy Nunan, Getting to (Global) Work with Andrea Komlosy: Discussing ‘Work: A Global History’ (Toynbee Prize Foundation)

Joel Rose, Alan Lomax’s Massive Archive Goes Online (NPR)

Spencer Robins, Wittgenstein, School Teacher (Paris Review)

Madeline:

Andrew Scull, “Mad World” (TLS)

John F. Burns, “Richard III Gets a Kingly Burial, on Second Try” (NYT)

Carol Ann Duffy, “Richard” (poem’s text in The Guardian)

Hilary Mantel, “How to Play Wolf Hall” (NYRBlog)

Robert Tombs, “The Paris Commune” (History Today)

Andrei Zorin, “Tolstoy Replays History” (TLS)

David Cooper, “Béla Bartók” (YaleBooks Blog)

3 comments

  1. There’s a fascinating methodological debate on Victorian studies, in and out of literature, which began at http://v21collective.org/ and has continued on that site and on Facebook. The first sight of that distant horseman, the revolt of literary scholarship against pervasive historicism (new, old and other)?

    Like

    1. Ooh thanks for the tip, Tony–I’ll need to delve into this more deeply (at first glance, frustrated as always with deployment of that dirty word “antiquarianism” as code for sourcework…).

      Like

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