Categories
Announcement

JHI Issue 82.3 Now Available

The new issue of the Journal of the History of Ideas (July 2021, 82.3) is now live on Project MUSE.

Over the coming weeks, we will publish short interviews with some of the authors featured in this issue about the historical and historiographical context of their respective essays. Look out for these conversations under the new rubric Broadly Speaking.

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Joseph Streeter, Conceptions of Tolerance in Antiquity and Late Antiquity, pp. 357 – 376.

Tamara Morsel-Eisenberg, Anxieties of Transmission: Rabbinic Responsa and Early Modern “Print Culture”, pp. 377 – 404.

Ami-Jacques Rapin, The First Conceptualization of Terrorism: Tallien, Roederer, and the “System of Terror” (August 1794), pp. 405 – 426.

Nicholas Heron, The Superhuman Origins of Human Dignity: Kantorowicz’s Dante, pp. 427 – 452.

Lisa Hellman and Birgit Tremml-Werner, Translation in Action: Global Intellectual History and Early Modern Diplomacy, pp. 453 – 467.

Sophie Holm, Multilingual Foreign Affairs: Translation and Diplomatic Agency in Eighteenth-Century Stockholm, pp. 469 – 483.

Lisa Hellman, Drawing the Lines: Translation and Diplomacy in the Central Asian Borderlands, pp. 485 – 501.

Birgit Tremml-Werner, A Question of Political Correctness: Translating Friendship across Time and Space, pp. 503 – 520.

Michael Facius, Terms of Government: Early Modern Japanese Concepts of Rulership and Political Geography in Translation, pp. 521 – 537.

Books Received, pp. 539 – 540.

Notices, pp. 541 – 543.

Categories
Announcement

Announcing the JHI’s new Executive Editors

As it embarks on its ninth decade, the Journal of the History of Ideas finds itself the flagship journal of an inter-disciplinary space in profound and exciting transformation. The JHI, and its Executive Editors in particular, would like to thank Anthony Grafton for fifteen years of luminous, generous, and truly consequential service as an Executive Editor. If there were a model editor anywhere, this would be Tony. 

Following a comprehensive, international search, we are delighted to announce the appointment of Manan Ahmed (Columbia University, History), Sophie Smith (University of Oxford, Politics), and Don J. Wyatt (Middlebury College, History) to join Martin J. Burke (CUNY Grad Center, History), Stefanos Geroulanos (NYU, History), and Ann Moyer (Univ. of Pennsylvania, History) as Executive Editors. 

With its newly expanded geographical, disciplinary, and temporal scope, the new editorial group looks forward to your submissions, whether in its areas of traditional strength or in new and emerging fields!

Categories
Announcement

JHI Seeks New Co-Executive Editor for Journal

The Journal of the History of Ideas seeks a new co-executive editor to join its editorial team.

Since its inception in 1940, the JHI has published work in intellectual history that is of common interest to scholars and students in a wide range of fields and disciplines. The Journal is committed to encouraging diversity in themes, regional coverage, chronological range, methodological approaches, and authorship. The successful candidate should be committed to fostering these goals. Discipline, period, and approach are open, but she or he should offer strengths that complement those of the other executive editors, Martin Burke, Stefanos Geroulanos, and Ann Moyer. The initial term of appointment will be three years, open to renewal. Review of applications will begin on June 1, 2021, and continue until the position is filled.

Please submit a cover letter and CV to the chair of the search committee, Warren Breckman (breckman@upenn.edu).


Categories
Announcement

Call for Contributing Editors

We are seeking additional contributing editors to join our editorial collective within the next three months.

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About us: The Journal of the History of Ideas Blog (JHI Blog), launched in 2015, is an online publication that aims to bring together today’s varied, burgeoning conversations in the field of intellectual history, broadly conceived. Like our parent journal, we understand intellectual history as an ecumenical and expansive field, encompassing a diverse set of methods, regional emphases, and periods, and bordering upon many other subfields and disciplines. We supplement the work of the JHI by commenting speedily on developments in the field, highlighting the perspectives of graduate students and early-career researchers, and presenting research in a different format from that afforded by print journals. 

The JHI Blog is coordinated by graduate students and supported by a community of committed contributing editors and guest contributors from a broad spectrum of higher education and public history institutions. We feature new content 2-3 times a week and cover various formats, including think pieces, written interviews, podcast interviews, conference reports, and exhibition reviews. Promoting new and exciting original scholarship, the Blog reaches a wide audience within and beyond the academy.

Responsibilities: Contributing editors (CEs) create, edit, and curate digital content for the JHI Blog on a voluntary basis. Their role is crucial in creating a platform for new voices, highlighting the work of fellow junior scholars, and critically engaging with debates and developments in the field. Working closely with the primary editors, CEs actively commission within their professional networks and also contribute their own pieces as desired. They should aspire to either commission or author a piece for the Blog roughly every 6 weeks. In addition, CEs have the opportunity to contribute to our monthly reading recommendations, host an episode for our podcast, organize thematic fora, and engage with published authors from our parent journal under our new rubric Broadly Speaking. All work is completed online and there are no required regular meetings.

The CE position is especially well-suited to graduate students and early-career scholars and offers access to a broad scholarly network and online community on Twitter and Facebook. We are particularly eager to extend our coverage of fields, experiences and methods not traditionally well-represented in intellectual history. Whatever the primary area of specialty, we would love to hear from a variety of disciplines beyond history.

Interested in joining? We are looking for new editors to begin soliciting and contributing pieces ideally within the next three months. Send us a brief email with your research and commissioning interests, your CV, and a brief writing sample of your choice (a blog post, conference paper, essay, book review, etc.) at blogjhi@gmail.com.

Categories
Announcement

JHI Issue 82.1 Now Available

The new issue of the Journal of the History of Ideas (January 2021, 82.1) is now live on Project MUSE.

Over the coming weeks, we will publish short interviews with some of the authors featured in this issue about the historical and historiographical context of their respective essays. Look out for these conversations under the new rubric Broadly Speaking.

NB: Elisabeth Åsbrink’s article and the Books Received section are freely available without a Project MUSE subscription.

* * *

Seth Kimmel, “Early Modern Iberia, Indexed: Early Modern Iberia, Indexed: Hernando Colón’s Cosmography” (pp. 1–28) 

Jeffrey Dymond, “Human Character and the Formation of the State: Reconsidering Machiavelli and Polybius 6” (pp. 29–50) 

Alessandro Nannini, “At the Bottom of the Soul: The Psychologization of the ‘Fundus Animae’ between Leibniz and Sulzer” (pp. 51–72) 

Fascisms and Their Afterli(v)es:
A Cluster of Essays Edited by Dagmar Herzog

Dagmar Herzog & Stefanos Geroulanos, “Fascisms and Their Afterli(v)es: An Introduction” (pp. 73–83) 

Sven Reichardt, “Fascism’s Stages: Imperial Violence, Entanglement, and Processualization” (pp. 85–107) 

Elissa Mailänder, “Masters of Sex? Nazism, Bigamy, and a University Professor’s Fight with Society and the State (1930–1970)” (pp. 109–131) 

Elisabeth Åsbrink, “When Race Was Removed from Racism:Per Engdahl, the Networks that Saved Fascism and the Making of the Concept of Ethnopluralism” (pp. 133–151)
(No Project MUSE subscription required)

Matías Grinchpun, “Not Six Million nor Thirty Thousand: From ‘Holocaust Revisionism’ to ‘State Terrorism’ Denial in Argentina, 1945–2016” (pp. 153–174)

Books Received (pp. 175-178)
(No Project MUSE subscription required)

Notices (pp. 189-181) 

Categories
Announcement

JHI Issue 81.4 Now Available

The new issue of the Journal of the History of Ideas (October 2020, 81.4) is now live on Project MUSE.

Over the coming weeks, we will publish short interviews with some of the authors featured in this issue about the historical and historiographical context of their respective essays. Look out for these conversations under the new rubric Broadly Speaking.

Nikhil Menon’s article and the Books Received section are both available without a Project MUSE subscription.

* * *

Bart Wauters, “Aquinas, ius gentium, and the Decretists” (pp. 509–29) 

Polly Ha, “Revolutionizing the New Model Army: Ecclesiastical Independence, Social Justice, and Political Legitimacy” (pp. 531–53) 

Pannill Camp, “The Theatre of Moral Sentiments: Neoclassical Dramaturgy and Adam Smith’s Impartial Spectator” (pp. 555–76) 

Bill Jenkins, “Physiology of the Haunted Mind: Naturalistic Theories of Apparitions in Early Nineteenth-Century Scotland” (pp. 577–97) 

Zoe Beenstock, “Reforming Utilitarianism: Lyric Poetry in J. S. Mill’s “Thoughts on Poetry and Its Varieties” and Autobiography” (pp. 599–620) 

Stéphane Guy, “Negotiating an “Economic Revolution”: History, Collectivism, and Liberalism in William Clarke’s Thought” (pp. 621–42) 

Nikhil Menon, “Gandhi’s Spinning Wheel: The Charkha and Its Regenerative Effects” (pp. 643–62)
(No Project Muse subscription required)

Books Received
pp. 663 
(No Project Muse subscription required) 

Notices
pp. 667–69 

Contents of Volume 81
pp. 673–74