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Announcement

Announcing the JHI’s 2021 Selma V. Forkosch Prize Winner

The winner of the JHI‘s Selma V. Forkosch Prize for the best article published in Volume 82 (2021) is Joseph Streeter, for “Conceptions of Tolerance in Antiquity and Late Antiquity” (volume 82, no. 3, pp. 357–76).

The judging committee provides the following statement:

The Selma V. Forkosch Prize committee has unanimously agreed to award the prize for the best essay published in the Journal of the History of Ideas in 2021 to Joseph Streeter for his article “Conceptions of Tolerance in Antiquity and Late Antiquity.” In this learned and lucidly argued study, the author, arguing convincingly against a large body of opinion that traces the origins of modern theories of “religious toleration” to Antiquity, brilliantly distinguishes ancient conceptions of “tolerance” from modern theories such as John Locke’s. With a critical awareness of the cultural difference separating early Christians like Tertullian and Lactanius from early modern advocates of toleration such as Voltaire and Pierre Bayle, the essay presents a philologically informed, coherent, and persuasive analysis of the divers senses of “tolerance” in Antiquity viewed in the context of the values, meanings, and practices shaped by ancient conceptions of “honor,” “anger,” “patience,” and “religion.” In capturing the meaning and significance of the concept of “tolerance” in Antiquity, this closely argued examination of its ancient contexts not only illustrates its differences from present beliefs, but also reveals what is distinctive about modern ideas of “toleration.”

Joseph Streeter is a historian of late antiquity with a side interest in the anthropology of religion. He is the co-editor, with Michael Whitby, of a collection of G.E.M. de Se. Croix’s essays entitled Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy for Oxford University Press, and of the essay “Should we worry about belief?” for the journal Anthropological Theory. He recently spoke with contributing editor Pranav Jain about the broader historical context of his prize-winning article.

The JHI Blog extends its deepest congratulations.

Categories
Announcement

JHI Issue 83.1 Now Available

The new issue of the Journal of the History of Ideas (January 2022, 83.1) is now live on Project MUSE.

Over the coming weeks, we will publish short interviews with some of the authors featured in this issue about the historical and historiographical context of their respective essays. Look out for these conversations under the rubric Broadly Speaking.

+ + +

Daniele Iozzia, A Beginner’s Success: The Impact of Plotinus’s First Treatise among Christians, pp. 1-16

Dan Edelstein, A “Revolution” in Political Thought: Translations of Polybius Book 6 and the Conceptual History of Revolution, pp. 17-40

Karie Schultz, Protestant Intellectual Culture and Political Ideas in the Scottish Universities, ca. 1600–50, pp. 41-62

Isaac Nakhimovsky, Georg Lukács and Revolutionary Realpolitik, 1918–19: An Essay on Ethical Action, Historical
Judgment, and the History of Political Thought
, pp. 63-85

Misha Tadd, Global Laozegetics: A Study in Globalized Philosophy, pp. 87-109

Isaiah Lorado Wilner, Body Knowledge, Part I: Dance, Anthropology, and the Erasure of History, pp. 111-142

Sarah Johnson, Farewell to The German Ideology, pp. 143-170
[OPEN ACCESS]

Books Received, pp. 171-173
[OPEN ACCESS]

Notices, 175-177

Categories
Announcement

JHI Issue 82.4 Now Available

The new issue of the Journal of the History of Ideas (October 2021, 82.4) is now live on Project MUSE.

Over the coming weeks, we will publish short interviews with some of the authors featured in this issue about the historical and historiographical context of their respective essays. Look out for these conversations under the new rubric Broadly Speaking.

***

Samu Niskanen, Anselm’s Predicament: The Proslogion and Anti-intellectual Rhetoric in the Aftermath of the Berengarian Controversy, pp. 547–568


Julian Koch, The “Urbild” or “Einbildung”: The Archetype in the Imagination in Eighteenth-Century German Aesthetics, pp. 569–591


David Dunning, The Logician in the Archive: John Venn’s Diagrams and Victorian Historical Thinking, pp. 593–614


Martin Beddeleem, Epistemological Battles on the Home Front: Early Neoliberals at War against the Social Relations of Science Movement, pp. 615–636


Sarah C. Dunstan, The Capital of Race Capitals: Toward a Connective Cartography of Black Internationalisms, pp. 637–660 [OPEN ACCESS]


Jenny Andersson, Planning the American Future: Daniel Bell, Future Research, and the Commission on the Year 2000, pp. 661–682


Babette Hellemans, The Immeasurability of the Monastic Mind: Writing about Peter Abelard (1079-1142), pp. 683–701

Books Received (pp. 703–704) [OPEN ACCESS]


Notices (pp. 705–707) 

Categories
Announcement

Announcing the JHI’s 2020 Morris D. Forkosch Book Prize Winner

Every year, the Journal of the History of Ideas awards the Morris D. Forkosch Prize for the best first book in intellectual history. 

The winner of the JHI ‘s 2020 Morris D. Forkosch Prize for the best first book in intellectual history is Hannah Marcus, for Forbidden Knowledge: Medicine, Science, and Censorship in Early Modern Italy (University of Chicago Press).

The judging committee writes:

A work of deep erudition and methodological breadth, Hannah Marcus’s Forbidden Knowledge: Medicine, Science, and Censorship in Early Modern Italy is the winner of the 2020 Morris D. Forkosch Prize for the best first book in intellectual history. 

In this elegant monograph, Marcus expertly guides us past the bright line of book burning and banned authors to explore the complex landscape of medical learning in early modern Italy under conditions of ecclesiastical censorship. Deftly navigating the indexes of prohibited books issued from Rome by Paul IV (1559) and Clement VIII (1596); Paul V’s theologian, Giovanni Maria Guanzelli (1607); and Alexander VII (1664), Marcus tells a story of institutional ambition complicated by varying forms of resistance, engagement, and negotiation within Counter-Reformation Italy. 

The “paradoxes of censorship” Marcus brings to light in her study are telling and legion. Lists of forbidden books did double duty as author advertisements and guides for library acquisitions. Compilations of offensive passages to be expurgated from books and removed from intellectual circulation inverted the humanist commonplace book in which readers copied out notable passages for reuse. Learning to read like ecclesiastical censors, physicians monitored their own writing and contributed to crowd-sourced expurgations, yet also strategically and successfully sought permission to read prohibited titles. On Marcus’s account, processes of prohibition, both explicit and tacit, created in turn a discursive space in which Catholic physicians articulated why they wanted to read banned books, as well as a set of material practices—slicing out authors’ names, overwriting offensive text, covering expurgated passages with slips of paper—that signal their reading of what was supposed not to be read.

Hannah Marcus is assistant professor of the history of science at Harvard University.  Her research focuses on the scientific culture of early modern Europe between 1400 and 1700.

The JHI Blog extends its deepest congratulations to Professor Marcus and looks forward to reading more of her work.

Categories
Announcement

JHI Issue 82.3 Now Available

The new issue of the Journal of the History of Ideas (July 2021, 82.3) is now live on Project MUSE.

Over the coming weeks, we will publish short interviews with some of the authors featured in this issue about the historical and historiographical context of their respective essays. Look out for these conversations under the new rubric Broadly Speaking.

***

Joseph Streeter, Conceptions of Tolerance in Antiquity and Late Antiquity, pp. 357 – 376.

Tamara Morsel-Eisenberg, Anxieties of Transmission: Rabbinic Responsa and Early Modern “Print Culture”, pp. 377 – 404.

Ami-Jacques Rapin, The First Conceptualization of Terrorism: Tallien, Roederer, and the “System of Terror” (August 1794), pp. 405 – 426.

Nicholas Heron, The Superhuman Origins of Human Dignity: Kantorowicz’s Dante, pp. 427 – 452.

Lisa Hellman and Birgit Tremml-Werner, Translation in Action: Global Intellectual History and Early Modern Diplomacy, pp. 453 – 467.

Sophie Holm, Multilingual Foreign Affairs: Translation and Diplomatic Agency in Eighteenth-Century Stockholm, pp. 469 – 483.

Lisa Hellman, Drawing the Lines: Translation and Diplomacy in the Central Asian Borderlands, pp. 485 – 501.

Birgit Tremml-Werner, A Question of Political Correctness: Translating Friendship across Time and Space, pp. 503 – 520.

Michael Facius, Terms of Government: Early Modern Japanese Concepts of Rulership and Political Geography in Translation, pp. 521 – 537.

Books Received, pp. 539 – 540.

Notices, pp. 541 – 543.

Categories
Announcement

Announcing the JHI’s new Executive Editors

As it embarks on its ninth decade, the Journal of the History of Ideas finds itself the flagship journal of an inter-disciplinary space in profound and exciting transformation. The JHI, and its Executive Editors in particular, would like to thank Anthony Grafton for fifteen years of luminous, generous, and truly consequential service as an Executive Editor. If there were a model editor anywhere, this would be Tony. 

Following a comprehensive, international search, we are delighted to announce the appointment of Manan Ahmed (Columbia University, History), Sophie Smith (University of Oxford, Politics), and Don J. Wyatt (Middlebury College, History) to join Martin J. Burke (CUNY Grad Center, History), Stefanos Geroulanos (NYU, History), and Ann Moyer (Univ. of Pennsylvania, History) as Executive Editors. 

With its newly expanded geographical, disciplinary, and temporal scope, the new editorial group looks forward to your submissions, whether in its areas of traditional strength or in new and emerging fields!