Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Colloquium: Mathijs Boom (UvA) and Stephen Snelders (UU) at the Descartes Centre, Utrecht University

Mathijs Boom: “Deltaic History: Reimagining Human and Natural History in the Low Countries, 1740-1840”

Stephen Snelders: “Public Dialogue in the Anthropocene: The Role of History”

February 16, 15:30 – 17:00 CET. Register.

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Book Presentation: Peter E. Gordon’s Migrants in the Profane: Critical Theory and the Question of Secularization (Yale, 2020)

In conversation Seyla Benhabib (Columbia / Yale), Max Pensky (Binghamton), and Hent de Vries (NYU). Hosted by the NYU / Columbia Intellectual History Workshop.

February 17, 5:00PM EST.
Via Zoom: Meeting ID: 917 0247 8228 | Passcode: 183165

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Seminar: Towards a History of Intellectual Labor: Gender, Negritude, and the Black Public Sphere
with Merve Fejzula (Missouri)

History of Political Ideas/Early Career Seminar, Institute of Historical Research at the School of Advanced Study, University of London.

February 17, 5:30pm-7:00pm GMT. Register.

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Symposium: Hope and Resistance in the Anthropocene

What does it mean to live, hope and resist in the anthropocene? What does environmental participation and being human entail in the ‘age of extinction’? In this symposium, we reflect on hope and resistance as a response to life and loss in the anthropocene, and ask what sustains us and what it means in practice and theory to be citizens and humans in these trying times. Full program here.

Organized by Dr Audrey Verma and JC Niala. 

February 19, 10am – 4pm GMT. Register.

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Conference: (Re)Constitutions of Choice: An Asynchronous/ Synchronous Event

What does it mean to make a choice? Decision-making is rarely as simple as right or wrong, black or white, yes or no: it is a murky and complex process filled with human (and nonhuman) will, impulse, and error. This event brings together artists, activists, and scholars from across disciplinary boundaries to explore how choices are made, and why. Join us for three exciting panels that examine the social, philosophical, and creative contours of choice-making.

Hosted by the Wolf Humanities Center, University of Pennsylvania.
February 19, 11:00am EST. Register.

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Seminar: “Wonder as a Problem for Islamic History,” with Travis Zadeh (Yale University)

Part of the Near Eastern Studies Virtual Seminar Series. Respondent: Daniel Sheffield, Near Eastern Studies.

February 22, 12:00 – 1:30pm. Register.

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Lecture: “Antisemitism and Fantasies of National Purity from Mussolini to the Present,” by Ruth Ben-Ghiat (NYU)

This talk will examine the place of fantasies of national purity in selected authoritarian states from Mussolini to the present, and how racial legislation and propaganda, such as that directed at Jews, factor into this larger context. We will look at the three timeframes and states of mind strongman leaders leverage: utopia, nostalgia, and crisis. Sponsored by the Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism and Whitney Humanities Center.

February 23, 5:00pm EST. Register.

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Book Talk: “The Broken Heart of America: St. Louis and the Violent History of the United States,” by Walter Johnson (Harvard)

In conversation with Cornel West (Harvard) and Suzannah Clark (Harvard). Hosted by the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard.

February 23, 6:00pm EST. Register.

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Seminar: “Sea-ing the City”
With Lalitha Kamath + Gopal Dubey (Tata Institute of Social Sciences), Nikhil Anand (University of Pennsylvania), Rhea Shah (University of Pennsylvania), Nityanand Jayaraman (Vettiver Collective), and Kelly Shannon (KU Leuven)

Working together since January 2019, Inhabited Sea is a research collaborative that examines how the cities of Mumbai may be remade with the seas, rains, tides, and storms of our climate-changed present. In this second of three public presentations, we screen + share the results of three projects that engage with the ways that Koli fishers, flamingoes and transit riders know and inhabit the seas in the city.

February 24, 3:00 – 5:00pm CET. Register.

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Discussion: “What is Antifa? Anti-fascism from 1930s Spain to 2020s North Carolina”
With James Chappel (Duke University), Denise Lynn (University of Southern Indiana), and Stuart Schrader (Johns Hopkins University)

Join a group of European and American historians for a discussion of the long and fascinating history of antifascism: a history that involves radical Communist women in the 1930s as much as punk rockers in the 1980s. Hosted by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute.

February 24, 12:00 – 1:15pm EST. Register.

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In Conversation: Joy Harjo (23rd US Poet Laureate) and Beth Piatote (UC Berkeley)

Harjo discusses her signature project as Poet Laureate. Living Nations, Living Words: A Map of First Peoples Poetry presents the work of contemporary Native poets in a national, fully digital and interactive map featuring audio recordings by authors. Developed in collaboration with the Library of Congress’s Geography and Map Division, the project maps 47 contemporary Native American poets across the country — including Louise Erdrich, Natalie Diaz, Ray Young Bear, and Craig Santos Perez. More information here.

February 25, 4:00pm, Livestream.

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Call for Papers: “Crisis and Its Temporalities.”
Read full call here.

2nd European University Institute Graduate Conference in Intellectual History, to take place on May 19-20, 2021 via Zoom. To submit a paper or propose a panel, please e-mail a short bio along with a titled abstract or panel proposal to our conference email address: ihwg.eui@protonmail.com. Abstracts should not exceed 300 words for papers of 20 minutes of length. Panel proposals should not exceed 900 words. Please note that applicants must be doctoral researchers and must not have defended their thesis by the dates of the conference. 

The call for abstract submissions will close on February 26 and successful applicants will be notified by March 9.

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Call for Papers: “Emergency in the History of Political Thought.”
Read full call here.

The 12th Annual London Graduate Conference, 24-25 June 2021, will explore the theme of ‘Emergency in the History of Political Thought’. To apply, please email a C.V. along with your proposal to historyofpoliticalthoughtnet@gmail.com.. Abstracts should be no more than 500 words for papers of 20 minutes in length. Panel proposals should include the titles of individual papers and not exceed 1500 words in total. As this is a graduate conference, please note that the organizers can only consider proposals from applicants who have not been awarded a doctorate. The conference will most likely follow a hybrid format. Please let us know whether you would like to present in person, circumstances permitting, or online, and which timezone you are based in.

For any queries, please contact the Organising Committee via email: historyofpoliticalthoughtnet@gmail.com.

The call for papers will close on March 26 at 23:59 GMT. Successful applicants will be notified no later than 28 April 2021


Featured Image: The Newspaper Carriers (Work Disgraces). Georg Scholz, 1921. The Art Institute of Chicago.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Author talk: “Driving While Black: African American Travel and the Road to Civil Rights”
Gretchen Sorin (SUNY Oneonta) in conversation with Catherine Allgor (MHS)

Driving While Black demonstrates that the car—the ultimate symbol of independence and possibility— has always held particular importance for African Americans, allowing black families to evade the dangers presented by an entrenched racist society and to enjoy, in some measure, the freedom of the open road. Melding new archival research with her family’s story, Gretchen Sorin recovers a lost history, demonstrating how, when combined with black travel guides—including the famous Green Book—the automobile encouraged a new way of resisting oppression.

Massachusetts Historical Society (MSH)
February 1, 5:3 – 6:30 pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Feedbacks and Tipping Points in Nature and Society”
Speaker: Dag O. Hessen (University of Oslo)

The contested term Anthropocene is widely used as a conceptual frame to describe the most recent era in Earth’s history where humans have radically changed the planet’s climate and ecosystems (Croetzen & Stoermer 2000). Drawing on current research, the lectures in this series explore how disciplines such as biology, earth system science, history, anthropology, geography, philosophy, science fiction studies or law respond and can contribute to a better understanding of the current planetary crisis. At the same time, the talks in this series ask about possibilities for far-reaching environmental and socio-political transformations.

The Oslo School of Environmental Humanities.
February 2, 4:15-5:00 pm (Central European Time). Register.

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Author talk: “Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic”
Speaker: Álvaro Santana-Acuña (Whitman College)
Commentators: Gisèle Sapiro (École des hautes études en sciences sociales; Centre national de la recherche scientifique, France); Mariano Siskind (Harvard University); Diana Sorensen (Harvard University).

Translated into dozens of languages, One Hundred Years of Solitude continues to enter the lives of new readers around the world. How did it achieve this unlikely success? And what does its trajectory tell us about how a work of art becomes a classic? Ascent to Glory is a groundbreaking study of One Hundred Years of Solitude by Álvaro Santana-Acuña, from the moment García Márquez first had the idea for the novel to its global consecration

Organized by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and cosponsored by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard University. 
February 2, 12:00 pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Author talk: “Futures of Enlightenment Poetry by Dustin Stewart”
Author: Dustin Stewart (Columbia University)
Panelists: Sophie Gee (Princeton University), Julie Crawford (Columbia University), Christopher Brown (Columbia University), Alan Stewart (Columbia University).

Dustin Stewart’s Futures of Enlightenment Poetry offers a revisionist account of poetry and embodiment from Milton to Romanticism. Scholars have made much of the period’s theories of matter, with some studies equating the eighteenth century’s modernity with its materialism. Yet the Enlightenment in Britain also brought bold new arguments for the immateriality of spirit and evocative claims about an imminent spirit realm. Protestant religious writing was of two minds about futurity, swinging back and forth between patience for the resurrected body and desire for the released soul. This ancient pattern carried over, the book argues, into understandings of poetry as a modern devotional practice. 

Presented by New Books in the Arts & Sciences.
The Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.
February 3, 6:15 pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Fugitive Archaeological Spaces
Part of #BlackInArchaeologyWeek
Panelists: (University of California, Merced); (New Mexico Highlands University; founding member of the Black Trowel Collective); Patricia Marinho (PhD, Archaeologist, Technical Advisor for Quilombola community, and a member of Rede de Arqueologia Negra); Jeannette Plummer Sires (Curator of Archaeological Assemblages at the British Museum and a founding member of the European Society of Black and Allied Archaeologists)

Moderated by Justin Dunnavant (Vanderbilt University and Co-founder/President of the Society of Black Archaeologists)

In this panel members of these new and emerging organizations will discuss their genesis, initiatives, as well as challenges and opportunities associated with empowering their communities in archaeology and heritage preservation.

Sponsored by the Society of Black Archaeologists, Indigenous Archaeology Collective, Archaeological Research Center at UC Santa Cruz, Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and SAPIENS
February 3, 4pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Nature’s Evil. A Cultural History of Natural Resources”
Speakers: Alexander Etkind (European University Institute at Florence); Maxine Berg (University of Warwick); Katja Castryck-Naumann (Leibniz-Institute for the History and Culture of Easter Europe, GWZO; European Network in Universal and Global History); Giorgio Riello (European University Institute; University of Warwick); Dina Gusejnova (London School of Economics and Political Science)

In his forthcoming book, Nature’s Evil. A Cultural History of Natural Resources (Polity, 2021), Alexander Etkind explores the non-human agency of natural resources such as sugar, fur, hemp, oil and others in their relations with the changing character of states. In their interaction with technology and labour, he argues, different natural resources give rise to different social institutions. The book looks at the classical problem of evil from two perspectives, postcolonial and postsocialist. The discussion of the book and its approach to what Etkind calls a ‘cultural history of natural resources’ will be followed by a roundtable conversation. Here, leading experts on global and transnational history will share ideas and practices of researching and teaching environmental history and the history of material culture from a global perspective.

Department of International History.
London School of Economics and Political Science.
February 4, 5:00pm-6:30pm (Eastern European Time/ GMT + 00:00). Register.

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Author talk: “Pipe Dreams: Water and Empire in Central Asia’s Aral Sea Basin”
Author: Maya Peterson (University of California, Santa Cruz)

This book talk explores the ways in which both the tsarist and Soviet regimes used fantasies of bringing the deserts to life as a means of claiming legitimacy in Central Asia, a process that ultimately led to the drying up of Central Asia’s Aral Sea. 

Central Asia Working Group. Berkeley Institute of East Asian Studies.
February 4, 8:00 pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “W.E.B. DuBois, Franz Boas, and ‘the Real Race Problem'”
Lee Baker (Duke University)

In this lecture on DuBois and anthropology, Dr. Baker will outline the relationship between DuBois and Boas during the first decade of the 20th century and describe how DuBois pragmatically used anthropology in The Crisis and other publications to elevate and vindicate African Americans in the struggle for freedom, liberty, and justice for all. Dr. Baker will also highlight the racist anti-racism of American Anthropology because Boas sincerely believed that “the real race problem” was the slow pace of racial amalgamation. After all, he explained, “in a race of octaroons, living among whites, the color question would probably disappear.”

Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University and Department of African & African-American Studies @ Duke University (AAAS)
February 5, 09:30-11:00am (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Author talk: “Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization by Michael Rothberg”
Author: Michael Rothberg (University of California, Los Angeles)

In this lecture, which coincides with the publication of the German translation of Multidirectional Memory, Michael Rothberg will introduce the arguments of his book, discuss its pertinence to coming to terms with colonial and genocidal pasts, and reflect on what it means to think multidirectionally today – in contemporary Germany and beyond. In the course of the lecture he will refer to some of the anticolonial and antiracist figures he discusses in the book – including Aimé Césaire and W.E.B. Du Bois – as well as the context of the Algerian War of Independence.

 Jour Fixe Initiative Berlin.
February 7, 7:00 pm (Central European Time). Register.

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Conference: “Illiberal Liberals: The Complexities of Progressive Ideals in the Twentieth-Century United States”
Panelists include Chris Babits (Utah State University), David Mislin (Temple University), Lora D. Burnett (Collin College), Augusta Dell’Omo (The University of Texas at Austin), and Benjamin L. Alpers (University of Oklahoma).

Discussions of the late twentieth century culture wars in the United States tend to default to stark dichotomies: liberal, educated elites in cosmopolitan areas are presented in contrast to conservative populists in rural America. While useful as a way of framing the broad contours of this political and cultural divide, this characterization obscures the diversity present on each side of the debate. The papers on this panel seek to interrogate this complexity by exploring three cases of “illiberal liberals”: individuals and groups whose progressive values contained decidedly conservative impulses.

 This panel is part of the Society for U.S. Intellectual History’s annual meeting, #USIH2021.
February 8, 7:00 pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Book Presentation: The Resistance Network: The Armenian Genocide and Humanitarianism in Ottoman Syria, 1915–1918, by Khatchig Mouradian

In conversation with Elyse Semerdjian (Whitman College), Margaret Lavinia Anderson (University of California Berkeley), Hamid Dabashi (Columbia University), Gil Hochberg (Columbia University) at the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

February 9, 6:00pm EST. Register.

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Lecture: “Two Ottoman Jewish Physicians,” by Prof. M. Shefer Mossensohn

Part of the evening lecture series “Jews and Health: Tradition, History, Practice” at the SOAS Centre for Jewish Studies.

February 10, 17:00 – 18:00 CET. Register.

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Lecture: “The Ethical Algorithm and the Future of Choice,” by Prof. Michael Kearns

Hosted by the Wolf Humanities Center and co-sponsored by the Department of Computer and Information Science and the Cinema & Media Studies Program at the University of Pennsylvania.

February 10, 5:00pm EST. Register.

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Book Launch: “Women’s International Thought: A New History,” edited by Patricia Owens and Katharina Rietzler

Discussion with Duncan Bell (Cambridge), Synne Dyvik (Sussex), and Matthew Specter (Berkeley), chaired by Joanne Paul (Sussex), at the Sussex Centre for Intellectual History.

February 11, 17:00 – 18:30 CET. Register.

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Conference: The (Re)Construction of the World: Aid. Solidarity. Politics.

With Achille Mbembe, Susan Buck-Morss, Rita Segato, Ulrike Herrmann, Sandro Mezzadra, Jean Ziegler. Hosted by Medico International, see full schedule here.

February 12-14. Register.

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Call for Papers: “Decolonising Archives, Rethinking Canons: Writing Intellectual Histories of Global Entanglements.”
Read full call here.

Both abstracts for individual presentation (350 words) and panel proposals (1200 words) are welcome. Submissions should be sent to cantabconference@gmail.com no later than the 5th of February, 2021.  The two-day conference will be hosted online, tentatively on the 26-27 March, 2021, between 9-6 PM GMT. 

For queries, feel free to write to Shuvatri Dasgupta (sd781@cam.ac.uk) or Rohit Dutta Roy (rd548@cam.ac.uk), Faculty of History, University of Cambridge.

Supported by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Faculty of History, University of Cambridge.

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Call for Papers: “Socialist Political Thought in East Central Europe, 1889–1968: Concepts, Debates, Questions.”
Read full call here.

Workshop taking place May 14 and 15, 2021 at Central European University in Budapest or online. Organized by the Intellectual History in East Central Europe Research Network. Initial paper proposals should be between 350–500 words in length. Applicants should include a short biographic summary with the applicant’s current institutional affiliation(s). Final paper presentations should strive to be between 20–25 minutes in length in order to allow for 15–20 minutes for Q&A sessions for each paper. The deadline for proposals is February 15.

Please send the documents to the following addresses:
Cody James Inglis (inglis_cody-james@phd.ceu.edu)
Una Blagojević (blagojevic_una@phd.ceu.edu)
Stefan Gužvica (guzvica.stefan@gmail.com)

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Call for Papers: “Crisis and Its Temporalities.”
Read full call here.

2nd European University Institute Graduate Conference in Intellectual History, to take place on May 19-20, 2021 via Zoom. To submit a paper or propose a panel, please e-mail a short bio along with a titled abstract or panel proposal to our conference email address: ihwg.eui@protonmail.com. Abstracts should not exceed 300 words for papers of 20 minutes of length. Panel proposals should not exceed 900 words. Please note that applicants must be doctoral researchers and must not have defended their thesis by the dates of the conference. 

The call for abstract submissions will close on February 26 and successful applicants will be notified by March 9.

***

Call for Papers: “Emergency in the History of Political Thought.”
Read full call here.

The 12th Annual London Graduate Conference, 24-25 June 2021, will explore the theme of ‘Emergency in the History of Political Thought’. To apply, please email a C.V. along with your proposal to historyofpoliticalthoughtnet@gmail.com.. Abstracts should be no more than 500 words for papers of 20 minutes in length. Panel proposals should include the titles of individual papers and not exceed 1500 words in total. As this is a graduate conference, please note that the organizers can only consider proposals from applicants who have not been awarded a doctorate. The conference will most likely follow a hybrid format. Please let us know whether you would like to present in person, circumstances permitting, or online, and which timezone you are based in.

For any queries, please contact the Organising Committee via email: historyofpoliticalthoughtnet@gmail.com.

The call for papers will close on March 26 at 23:59 GMT. Successful applicants will be notified no later than 28 April 2021


Featured Image: The Newspaper. James Tissot, 1883. The Art Institute of Chicago.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Workshop: “Immobility/Mobility”
Speakers: Gianamar Giovannetti-Singh (Cambridge): Knowledges of geography and geographies of knowledge: Martino Martini’s Novus atlas sinensis and the emergence of mathematical cosmography; Amrita DasGupta (SOAS): Defining mobility in the lower deltaic Bengal: Climate exile and trafficking.

The Workshop for the Early Modern Period (WEMP) provides a forum for graduate students to present research on any aspect of early modern history. The Zoom links to join the virtual meeting will be circulated to the workshop mailing list.

Cambridge Workshop for the Early Modern Period.
January 18, 2021, 5:00 pm (Western European Time/GMT +00:00). Register.

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Lecture: “Holocaust Historiography: Past Present”
Speakers: Prof. Dan Michman (Bar Ilan University and Yad vashem); Prof. Dan Stone (Royal Holloway, University of London)

The Holocaust Studies Program. Western Galilee College, Akko, Israel.
Wednesday, 20 January 2021, 19:30-21:00 Israel Time, 12:30-14:00pm (Eastern Time, USA and Time). Register.

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Webinar: “Freethinkers in Europe: National and Transnational Secularities, 1789−1920s”
Speakers: Carolin Kosuch (Göttingen); Johannes Gleixner (Munich); Daniela Haarmann (Vienna); and Claus Spenninger (Munich).

International Society for Historians of Atheism, Secularism, and Humanism (ISHASH) Webinar Series.

Wednesday, 20 January 2021, 10.00 PT, 13.00 ET, 18.00 GMT, and 19.00 CET. Register.

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Seminar: “Ex-communism and the languages of interwar Marxism: the case of Franz Borkenau in Spain”
Speakers: Nick Devlin (Cambridge)

The Institute of Historical Research. School of Advanced Study. University of London.

Wednesday, 20 January 2021, 5:30pm – 7:00pm (Western European Time / GMT +00:00). Register.

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Reading Group Meeting: “Global Intellectual History”

For the first 2021 session of the EUI IHWG series “History in theory, history in use,” we will talk about global intellectual history(-ies). How to write global intellectual history? To what extent does the adjective “global” change one’s approach towards intellectual history? How to forge a methodology for it, and which tools we might use in approaching it?

Suggested readings:
· Samuel Moyn and Andrew Sartori, “Approaches to Global Intellectual History” in: idem, Global Intellectual History, New York 2013, pp. 3-30.
· Dag Herbjørnsrud, Beyond decolonizing: global intellectual history and reconstruction of a comparative method, Global Intellectual History Vol 5 Nr 4.

Monday, 25 January 2021, 9:00 am CET

To receive the link for the readings and Zoom, please contact Olga Byrska (olga.byrska@eui.eu).

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Seminar: “Histories of the Book”

For the sixth session of the “Talking about things” seminar series, we will consider visual and material histories of the book. This session will host two presentations, followed by questions and a discussion. See full description of the event here.

Organized by the Visual and Material History Working Group at EUI.

Monday, 25 January 2021, 11:00am CET. Register.

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Working Group: “Historical International Relations”

Starting in January 2021, a reading group focusing on deep histories, big histories, frontiers, energy, ‘Asia before Europe’, entangled histories, and the Global Cold War but we are keen to expand.

Visit www.historical.international to participate in the discussions or suggest readings.

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Call for Papers: “Un/Predictable Environments: Politics, Ecology and Agency (20-21 May 2021)”
Read full call here.

The conference is organised by: Prof John Barry (Professor in Politics, Queen’s University Belfast, UK); Dr Maruška Svašek (Reader in Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast, UK); Dr Prashant Khattri (Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of Allahabad, India, and Charles Wallace Fellow, Queens University Belfast, UK); Dr Tracey Heatherington (Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Canada)

Send a 200 word abstract before January 31, 2021 to m.svasek@qub.ac.uk .

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Call for Papers: “Decolonising Archives, Rethinking Canons : Writing Intellectual Histories of Global Entanglements.”
Read full call here.

Both abstracts for individual presentation (350 words) and panel proposals (1200 words) are welcome. Submissions should be sent to cantabconference@gmail.com no later than the 5th of February, 2021.  The two-day conference will be hosted online, tentatively on the 26-27 March, 2021, between 9-6 PM GMT. 

For queries, feel free to write to Shuvatri Dasgupta (sd781@cam.ac.uk) or Rohit Dutta Roy (rd548@cam.ac.uk), Faculty of History, University of Cambridge.

Supported by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Faculty of History, University of Cambridge.

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Call for Papers: “Education and Educators in Political Thought”
Read full call here.

The Conference will be held virtually on March 31, 2021. Interested doctoral students should send proposals, comprised of a short abstract (max. 500 words) and a brief CV (max. 2 pages), to chptconference@gmail.com with the subject “PTHI Conference submission.” The deadline for proposals is:  Friday, February 12, 2021.

The Political Thought and Intellectual History Graduate Conference.
University of Cambridge.

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Call for Submissions: “The S-USIH Book Prize”

The Society for U. S. Intellectual History (S-USIH) is pleased to open the call for submissions for its Annual Book Award for the best book in U.S. intellectual history.

The book should be a work of original scholarship and should cover some aspect of American intellectual history. Books eligible for the 2021 award must be published in English in the period between Jan. 1, 2020 and Dec. 31, 2020. Any member of the Society or any publisher may nominate books for the award. The winner will be announced in June 2021, receive a $250.00 prize, and be recognized at the 2021 Conference in Nashville (October ). The winning author must be a member of the Society at the time of this presentation. Deadline for submissions:  February 15, 2021

Instructions for submission can be found at S-USIH.

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Book presentation: “The Enlightenment: The Pursuit of Happiness, 1680-1790 (2020) by Ritchie Robertson (Oxford)”
Discussants: Joanna Innes (Oxford); Anthony La Vopa (North Carolina); Karen O’Brien (Oxford)
Followed by the author’s response and an open discussion.

The Enlightenment Workshop, Oxford’s interdisciplinary research seminar in Enlightenment studies, is dedicated this term to discussions of new publications in the field.  The launch session is focused on The Enlightenment: The Pursuit of Happiness, 1680-1790, a major new interpretation by Ritchie Robertson, the Schwarz-Taylor Professor of German at Oxford.

Supported by the Faculty of History, and the Faculty of Modern Languages at Oxford University, and the Voltaire Foundation.

January 25, 12:00pm – 2:00pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Steppe Irrigation: Water, Rivers, and Canalization in the USSR”
Presenters: Maya Peterson (University of California, Santa Cruz); Christopher Ward (Clayton State University)

The desiccation of the Aral Sea is one of the greatest environmental catastrophes of the late twentieth century. But efforts to harness and divert the Aral’s freshwater are rooted in efforts to use technology to terraform landscape in the modern era. Using water to irrigate a wasteland was a hallmark of modernity, progress, productivity, and prosperity. Water was also emblematic of the colonial infrastructure of Russia and the Soviet Union. This live interview with Maya Peterson and Christopher Ward will discuss the role of water in its winder environmental history of the Soviet project.

The Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies,
University of  Pittsburgh
January 26, 12:00pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Webinar: “Implicated Subjects in the Landscapes of Injustice”
Speakers: Michael Rothberg (UCLA); Jordan Stanger-Ross (UVic) Moderator: Charlotte Schallié (UVic)

A conversation about the legacies of historical injustice. Reflecting on the intersections and differences between their respective areas of research, the speakers will discuss the present imperatives that emerge from histories of harm followed by question and answer period with audience members.

Presented in association with Landscapes of Injustice and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum. University of Victoria.
January 27, 2:00pm – 3:00pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “How to Decolonize your Research Methods? Philosophy of/as Action Research “
Speaker: David Ludwig (Wageningen University, Netherlands)
Chaired by Azita Chellappoo (Ruhr-University Bochum)

What would it mean to decolonize philosophy of science? This talk shifts the focus from basic research to action research as a methodology for putting scientific practice in the service of social change and social justice. Tracing the history of action research in the domain of international development, it outlines methodological shifts from a paternalistic humanitarianism of developing the “Third World” to critical engagement with the co-production of science and society. In a second step, the talk applies these methodological lessons to philosophy as science. “Philosophy of action research” therefore leads to “philosophy as action research” as one mode of articulating decolonial ambitions in philosophical practice.

Series organisers: Zinhle Mncube (University of Johannesburg/University of Cambridge); Azita Chellappoo (Ruhr-University Bochum); Katherine Furman (University of Liverpool); Dominic Berry (London School of Economics/University of Birmingham)

January 28, 4:00 pm Central European Time (15:00 GMT). Register.

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Webinar: “Is it possible to decolonize Anthropology?”
Discussants: Kamari Maxine Clarke (University of Toronto); Ryan Cecil Jobson (University of Chicago)

Join this Theory from the Margins webinar, for a panel discussion on the politics of racial justice, climate justice, ethical codes and publics of anthropology, and the possibility of decolonisation in the discipline. TfM will be in conversation with Prof. M. Kamari Clarke and Ryan Cecil Jobson.

January 28, 16.00-17.30 CET. Info.

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Lecture: “Imperial Entanglements: Rethinking Modernity with and beyond Zygmunt Bauman”

Presenter: Shalini Randeria (Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna; Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva)

Engaging critically with Zygmunt Bauman’s contribution to our understanding of modernity, which played an important role in shifting the debate beyond the teleology of unilinear modernisation, this lecture addresses the Eurocentrism that characterises not only classical but also contemporary sociological theorisations of modernity, including that of Bauman. It will examine some recent alternative theorisations in terms of plural, regional or vernacular modernities. In a postcolonial perspective, it will be argued that only a consideration of imperial spatial and temporal entanglements allows us to grasp modernity as relational in the past and in the present. It illustrates these using ethnographic material from my own field research in India on legal entanglements.

Anyone interested in attending should register by writing to baumaninstitute@leeds.ac.uk to receive the links for any/all of the Post-Colonial Bauman talks.
January 28, 4:00pm – 6:00pm (Western European Time). Info.

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Lecture: “Malinowski: Anthropology, De-Colonialism, and Race”
Speakers: Vicky Barnecutt (British Library, True Echoes project); Dr Freddy Foks (Cambridge, King’s College); Emma Pizarro (LSE Library) 

A century after the publication of Argonauts of the Western Pacific, this panel recontextualises Malinowski in the context of colonialism.

The London School of Economics and Political Science Library
January 28, 8:00 am – 9:00 am (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Hydrofictions: Water, Power, and Politics in Israeli and Palestinian Literature”
Speaker: Dr. Hannah Boast (University College Dublin)

Water in Israel/Palestine is a major topic of political debate, but how has it been understood in Israeli and Palestinian literature and culture? This talk outlines different approaches that contemporary Israeli and Palestinian authors have taken to the issue of water, from the draining of the swamps in the early years of Zionist settlement to the contamination of the River Jordan in the present day. In doing so, it introduces methods for reading the resource of water in literature, shows the contribution of literary studies to wider hydropolitical discourse, and foregrounds Israeli and Palestinian literature as neglected but crucial areas for the Environmental Humanities.

The Environmental Humanities Network in the Jackman Humanities Institute at the University of Toronto
January 29, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Bauman’s Analysis of European Modernity, its Local and Remote Others, and the Colonial Imprint of the Christian Imaginary”

Professor Griselda Pollock (University of Leeds)
Co-introduced by Prof. Janet Wolff (University of Manchester) and Prof. Max Silverman (University of Leeds)

With the currency of intersectionality in feminist theory, the widespread demand for decolonisation of knowledge and the urgencies of the Black Lives Matter movement, I propose to examine if and how Zygmunt Bauman’s reflections on Christian Europe’s modernity and its local Others have a place in our considerations of postcolonial critique. European colonialism evangelised for a Christianity enacting domination and economic exploitation in its name. This lecture locates Bauman’s indirect relation to Modern Jewish Studies as a site for discovering a postcolonial Bauman, drawing on several specific examples from art/film created in response to traumatic events of the twentieth century.

Anyone interested in attending should register by writing to baumaninstitute@leeds.ac.uk to receive the links for any/all of the Post-Colonial Bauman talks.
January 29, 4:00pm – 6:00pm (Western European Time). Info.

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Seminar: “Introduction to Adorno and Identity: Adorno, Du Bois, and negative identity “
Jonathon Catlin (Princeton), Eric Oberle (Arizona State), and Fumi Okiji (Berkeley)

The first of a series of virtual seminars focusing on  “Adorno and Identity,” convened by Jonathon Catlin, Eric Oberle, and Fumi Okiji. Meetings will take place on Zoom every other Friday over the course of the spring 2021 semester, beginning January 29 (1–3pm US EST). Each session will consist of two parts: three presentations of roughly 15 minutes each, followed by an hour of discussion amongst participants and the public audience. An open Zoom link (no registration required) and outlines of the presentations will be posted on the official website prior to the first session.

The seminars are supported by Princeton University’s Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in the Humanities (IHUM).

January 29, 01:00pm – 3:00pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Seminar: “Vico’s Poetic Wisdom: Lessons For The Contemporary World”
A Two-Day Virtual Seminar with Giulio Gora (Università Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy)

January 29, 3:00-4:30 PM EST: Vico, Poetic Logic, and Metaphor
Respondent: Alexander Bertland (Niagara University, USA)

February 5, 3:00-4:30 PM EST: Vico and the Origin of History
Respondent: Antonio Calcagno (King’s University College at Western University, Canada)

Organized by: Theorizing Italy, a CNYHC Working Group; Coordinator: Silvia Benso, Rochester Institute of Technology.
Register here.


Featured Image: Anders Zorn, 1887. Emma Zorn, Lasande. Zorn Collections, Mora, Sweden.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Webinar: “Native Nations and Anglo-American Law”
Moderator: Michael Leroy Oberg (SUNY-Geneseo)
Panel: Daniel Mandell (Truman State University); Craig Yirush (University of California, Los Angeles); Zachary Conn (Yale University); Julia Lewandoski (California State University, San Marcos)

Native nations have always held an ambiguous status in Anglo-American law. This roundtable brings together junior and senior scholars researching how indigenous groups sought to maintain their autonomy and resources during the critical 19th century in North America, and will consider broad questions in the evolving status of Native communities. This moderated roundtable discussion will include presentations by each panelists, followed by a discussion of broader questions in the evolving status of Native communities and the conflicts between indigenous sovereignty and the claims of democracy in the US and Canada. Audience questions and discussion of these issues will also be a significant part of the session.

American Historical Association Colloquium.
January 5, 2021, 5:00 pm (Eastern Time – US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Slow History”
Introduction: Jacqueline Jones (AHA president-elect, University of Texas at Austin)
Speaker: Mary Lindemann (AHA president, University of Miami)

All historians realize how much COVID-19 has interfered with our scholarship and teaching. Everything has slowed down, from preparing for classes, to doing research, to completing the simplest tasks of everyday life. Yet in the upheaval we are currently experiencing, and as we struggle to remain productive, perhaps we should also seize the opportunity to think more deeply about the “doing” of history and to isolate what really matters in research, writing, and instruction. Scholars in other disciplines have been doing so for several years and some have even issued manifestos like the one advocating “slow science.” Should we follow their lead? “Is going slow good for historians as well?”

American Historical Association Presidential Address.
Wednesday, January 6, 2021, 7:00 pm (Eastern Time – US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “U.S. Education and the Pandemic: Literary and Cultural Insights”
Amy Mohr (LMU/Amerika-Institut)

This lecture series will put the current COVID-19 pandemic in historical perspective by looking at past outbreaks of such devastating diseases as the bubonic plague, cholera, polio, HIV/AIDS, and others. Faculty of the Amerika-Institut and guest speakers will scrutinize the public health system of the United States, the impact of and the debates surrounding the politics of vaccinations, the social and cultural significance of quarantines and the unequal distribution of pain and death.

Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
Thursday, January 7, 2021, 4:15–5:45 pm (Central European Time). Register.

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Lecture: “New Directions in the History of Education AHA Colloquium 2021”
Chair: Margaret O’Mara (University of Washington)
Panel: Emily J. Levine (Stanford University); Ian McNeely (University of Oregon); Adam Nelson (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

After years of relative neglect historians are training fresh eyes on the history of education. What is to be gained by this recent inquiry? How does bringing the history of knowledge institutions in line with general trends in historiography alter our understanding of 19th and 20th century US and European history? Join scholars in early colonial and post-war US history, and European cultural and intellectual history of the 19th and 20th centuries to interrogate this new educational “turn” and its meanings for the field of history.

American Historical Association Colloquium.
Friday, January 8, 2021, 1:00 pm (Eastern Time – US and Canada). Register.

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Call for Papers: “Force of Myth: Authority, Illusion, and Critique in Modern Imaginaries.” Read Call for Papers here.
Conference dates: Monday–Wednesday, June 7–9, 2021.
This will be an online-only event, held over Zoom on three consecutive days, 3–4 hours per day.

Keynote Speakers Chiara Bottici (New School of Social Research); Bernard Harcourt (Columbia University); Pini Ifergan (Bar-Ilan University; The Spinoza Center, The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute).

Deadline: Sunday, January 31, 2021. Info and submissions at: forceofmyth2021@gmail.com

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Seminar: “Water Over the Dam: The Destruction of Colonial New England’s River Fisheries”
Zachary Bennett (Norwich University)
Matthew McKenzie (University of Connecticut)

River restoration projects across North America are dismantling dams to restore the legendary fish runs of the past. People incorrectly point to the industrial revolution as the culprit. This paper will show that fish disappeared from most of southern New England’s rivers one hundred years before that. The destruction of New England’s fish runs triggered a cascade of economic and environmental changes that shaped legal and political culture during the Revolution and early republic.
Registered participants will receive the paper for this session the day before the seminar by email.

Massachusetts Historical Society. Environmental History Seminar.
January 12, 2021, 5:15pm – 6:30pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Never Waste a Good Crisis? Presidential Crisis Management from the Great Depression to the Coronavirus Pandemic”
Andreas Etges (LMU/Amerika-Institut)

This lecture series will put the current COVID-19 pandemic in historical perspective by looking at past outbreaks of such devastating diseases as the bubonic plague, cholera, polio, HIV/AIDS, and others. Faculty of the Amerika-Institut and guest speakers will scrutinize the public health system of the United States, the impact of and the debates surrounding the politics of vaccinations, the social and cultural significance of quarantines and the unequal distribution of pain and death.

Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
January 14, 2021, 10:00am (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Fugitivity”
Chair: Stephanie E. Smallwood (University of Washington, Seattle)
Panel: Stephen Best (University of California, Berkeley); Kellie Carter Jackson (Wellesley College); Viola Franziska Müller (Utrecht University); Matthew Pinsker (Dickinson College); Edward B. Rugemer (Yale University); Stephanie Smallwood

Scholars have recently identified fugitivity as central problem in the history of slavery. This roundtable seeks to bring together some of the leading thinkers about the history of fugitivity for a discussion of the historical and historiographical stakes that it entails.

American Historical Association
January 14, 2021, 02:00pm (Eastern Time, US and Canada). Register.

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Lecture: “Epistemic Decolonisation: what, why, how?”
Veli Mitova

Chaired by Zinhle Mncube (University of Johannesburg/University of Cambridge)

The decolonisation of knowledge is finally – and happily – becoming a hot topic in anglophone philosophy. But what exactly is epistemic decolonisation? why should we engage in it? and how should we go about it? In this talk, I draw on African thinkers to construct a roadmap of the terrain along these three axes for theorising epistemic decolonisation, and to argue that some answers to the what, why, and how questions are better than others.

Series organisers: Zinhle Mncube (University of Johannesburg/University of Cambridge); Azita Chellappoo (Ruhr-University Bochum); Katherine Furman (University of Liverpool); Dominic Berry (London School of Economics/University of Birmingham)

January 15, 2021, 16:00 SAST (14:00 GMT). Register

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Lecture: “City and countryside: the infrastructure of water in colonial Bangalore”
Aditya Ramesh (University of Manchester)

This open lecture is part of Oslo Metropolitan University South Asia Seminar Series (Chapter 1: India). The theme for Oslo Metropolitan University South Asia Seminar Series is Perceptions of Environment.

Oslo Metropolitan University 
January 15, 2021, 4:00pm to 5:30pm (Central European Standard Time). Register.


Featured Image: Jean-Marc Côté, 1899. France in 2000 year (XXI century). France, paper card . Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Lecture: “This Land is My/Our/Their Land”
Jared Farmer (University of Pennsylvania)
Bethany Wiggin (University of Pennsylvania)

With storm surges and wildfires causing heartbreaking property damage, the environmental is the emotional. But that’s always been the case. From the leafy east to the mountainous west, the American landscape has been tied to overlapping—and competing—senses of identity at the individual, subnational, and national levels. Place attachment, or topophilia, would seem to be a precursor for sustainability, but even love has its dark side.


Penn Lightbulb Café, University of Pennsylvania.
Monday, December 7, 2020, 12:00 pm -1:20 pm EST. Register.

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Workshop: “An American Historikerstreit: Holocaust Representation and the Specter of Deconstruction”
Jonathon Catlin (Princeton University)

Princeton University, Modern Europe Workshop.
Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 12:00 pm -1:20 pm EST. Register.

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Lecture: “Readings and Mis-readings of Primitive Accumulation,” Cinzia Arruzza (New School for Social Research)

Yale University, Franke Lectures in the Humanities
Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 6:00 pm EST. Register.

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Conference: “In Search of a Concrete Universal: A Conference in Honor of Seyla Benhabib”
Conference Program.

Participants will include: Angélica Bernal, Drucilla Cornell, Paul Linden-Retek, Peter Verovšek, Cristina Lafont, Umur Basdas, Thomas McCarthy, Kenneth Baynes, Richard Bernstein, Rainer Forst, Bernard Harcourt, Rahel Jaeggi, William Scheuerman, Lorenzo Simpson, Peter E. Gordon, Carolin Emcke, Sonali Chakravarty, Gaye Demiryol, Ayten Gündoğdu, Patchen Markell, Christian Volk, Anna Jurkevics, Carmen Dege, Matthew Longo, Eduardo Mendieta, Max Pensky, Judith Resnik, and Karuna Mantena

The Department of Political Science (Yale University), the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, the Whitney Humanities Center, the Department of Philosophy (Yale University), and the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought (CCCCT).
Friday, December 11, 2020, 9 am – 6 pm EST. RSVP here.

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Lecture: The Temporalities of Work: Labor Patterns and Politics in Bombay Cotton Mills, 1875 – 1900, with Hatice Yildiz

Harvard University, History of Global Capitalism Seminar
Monday, December 14, 2020, 3:45pm to 5:45pm EST. Register.

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Discussion: Melancholy in Politics, Literature, Philosophy

Nitzan Lebovic (Lehigh), Vivian Liska (Antwerp), and Rebecca Comay (Toronto) will discuss melancholy as a historical term, a textual practice, and a philosophical worldview. Mikhal Dekel (City College NY) joins as moderator.

NYU Center for the Humanities
Wednesday, December 16, 2020, 12:30 pm EST. Register.

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Workshop: “Black Sirens’ Song, or Listening for the Sirens after the Catastrophe”, with Jessica Ruffin

Engaging Black feminist thought and Schopenhauer’s ethics, this paper reimagines Adorno’s and Horkheimer’s interpretation of Odysseus’ encounter with the Sirens in order to propose an anti-racist figure of ethical receptivity.

Duke University, Franklin Humanities Institute
Thursday, December 17, 2020 – 2:00pm to 3:15pm EST. Register.

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Lecture: Mirrors of History. Discussing Gallantry in Eighteenth-Century Spain and Italy, with Mónica Bolufer

This talk will consider the representation of gallantry in eighteenth-century Spain and Italy, taking a comparative perspective. Specifically, it will discuss the relationship between men and married ladies under the names of cortejo or cicisbeo. This will enable us to explore some of the roles played by gender in the construction of the symbolic North/South divide within Europe. It will do so by analyzing the game of mirrors between travel narratives by Northern observers (particularly British and French) and the ways Spanish and Italian Enlightened writers responded to them. Partly (and sometimes unconsciously) these writers similarly incorporated some of their views, resulting in competing narratives around the place of gallantry, past and present, in the process of civilization.

European University Institute, Intellectual History Working Group.

Friday, December 18, 2020, 10:00 am CET. Contact Elisavet.Papalexopoulou@eui.eu to register.


Featured Image: Julius Hübner. Der Anschlag von Luthers 95 Thesen (1875).

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.

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Hans Blumenberg Seminar Series and Special Events

30 November, Willem Styfhalls (Leuven) Hans Blumenberg’s eschatology – On the Metaphor of the World’s Doom
7 December Pini Ifergan (Bar-Ilan) Goethe and Philosophy? Blumenberg’s version

All seminars on Mondays, 5 pm (UK time) on zoom at https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89764748793
Convener: Audrey Borowski (Oxford). Link.

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Lecture: “The Memory of Racial Terror: The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and the Legacy Museum,” Marita Sturken (New York University)

Cultural Memory Seminar, Columbia University
Monday, Nov 30, 2020 03:00 PM EST. Register.

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Lecture: “German as a Jewish Problem,” Marc Volovici (Birkbeck College)

Institute for Polish-Jewish Studies, University of Oxford
Tuesday, December 1, 6:30pm GMT. Register.

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Conference: Singularity’s -abilities: In Celebration of Samuel Weber’s 80th Birthday

On the occasion of Samuel Weber’s 80th birthday, twelve scholars who have been inspired and influenced by his work will give short papers, reflecting on the ways in which Weber’s thinking constellates with their own, revealing a singular multiplicity of disciplines.
Presentations will be in English and German.

Tuesday, December 1, 2020, 9:00AM – 1:30PM  CST. Register.

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Lecture: “Money and Capital in Volume I of Capital,” Fred Moseley (Mount Holyoke College)

Yale University, Franke Lectures in the Humanities
Wednesday, December 2, 2020, 6:00pm EST. Register.

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Roundtable: Experiencing and Remembering Cultural Trauma

As illness and deaths mount and COVID-19 continues to exact its toll, there is no question that we are experiencing a cultural trauma of enormous magnitude and globality.  The time is right for asking: What does it mean for a community as a whole to experience trauma? How does the community represent the trauma, both as it is unfolding and in the future? How will it remember the trauma in the future? How will these memories affect future experiences? 

Center for Public Scholarship, New School for Social Research
Friday, December 4, 2020, 12:00PM to 1:30pm (EST). Register.


Featured Image: Eastman Johnson, Interesting News, 1872.