Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Lecture: “Castration Fever: On Trans, Body, and Psychoanalysis in Modern China,” (Howard Chiang, UC Davis)

Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago

This lecture considers the evolution of the speaker’s research over the last 15 years in which the treatment of castration as a historical problem holds promise for bridging disparate scholarly fields and paradigms.

Monday, May 10, 5:00pm CDT. Registration.

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Public Conversation: David Runciman and Pankaj Mishra on Histories of Ideas

London Review of Books

To mark the conclusion of the second series of the podcast Talking Politics: History of Ideas, David Runciman will be joined by Pankaj Mishra, author of Age of Anger and Bland Fanatics, for a conversation about those subjects of David’s that Pankaj has also written about extensively – including Gandhi, Rousseau and Nietzsche – alongside an alternative canon of non-Western theorists of politics and crisis.

Tuesday, 11 May, 7 p.m. UK Time. Registration.

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Public Conversation: Paul Gilroy and Ruth Wilson Gilmore on Stuart Hall’s Selected Writings on Race and Difference

Theory from the Margins

In Selected Writings on Race and Difference, editors Paul Gilroy and Ruth Wilson Gilmore gather more than twenty essays by Stuart Hall that highlight his extensive and groundbreaking engagement with race, representation, identity, difference, and diaspora.

Thursday, May 13 at 8 AM CDT. Link.

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Book Launch: Knowledge Worlds: Media, Materiality, and the Making of the Modern University, by Reinhold Martin

Heyman Center at Columbia University

Addressing media theory, architectural history, and the history of academia, Knowledge Worlds reconceives the university as a media complex comprising a network of infrastructures and operations through which knowledge is made, conveyed, and withheld.

Friday, May 14, 1:00pm EDT. Registration.

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Conference: Global Early Modern Formations of Race and Their Afterlives

Cornell University

This event will examine early modern formations of race and their enduring presence in the contemporary world. While the intertwined operations of settler colonialism and the mass enslavement of Africans still shape the experiences of Indigenous people and those of the African diaspora today, so do the multiple historical and present-day resistances to these actions.

Friday, May 14, 4-6pm EDT & Saturday, May 15, 1-3pm EDT. Link.

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Lecture: Undisciplining (Environmental) Humanities: Collective Reconstruction of the Histroy of the Gulf of California, Mexico (Micheline Cariño Olvera)

KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory

The EHL have been Undisciplining the Environmental Humanities since 2011. But what do we and others mean when we use the expression? Join us in this series of seminars, as we meet to discuss this and to share experiences from our undisciplining practices around the world.

Friday, May 14, 2021 at 11 AM CDT. Link

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Lecture: “The Workers’ University: Defending Social Care” (Damir Arsenijevic)

KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory

Monday, May 17, 11 am CEST. Link

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Public Conversation: History After Hours: Podcasting the Past, with Averill Earls (DIG Podcast) and Professor Jarett Henderson

UC Santa Barbara History Department

History After Hours is an hour-long Zoom conversation designed to provide alternative forms of learning and enrichment to undergraduate students by focusing on the opportunities that exist (both on and off-campus) to hone their skills as historians in training (History majors, minors, and the History curious are all welcome).

Tuesday, May 18, 4:00 PM PDT. Link.

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Lecture: Art Talk Live: “Reframing the Tianlongshan Cave Temple Fragments,” (Sarah Laursen, Harvard Art Museums)

Harvard Art Museums

In 1943, the museum was gifted 25 stone fragments from the Tianlongshan cave temples in China’s northern Shanxi province. Beginning in the late 1920s, the reliefs and sculptures were removed from the site and published by art dealer Sadajirō Yamanaka, sparking interest among collectors worldwide. This talk will highlight a collaboration with Harvard students that investigates the creation of the works, their meaning in Buddhist medieval China, their sale and journey to their current home, and the ravaged site they left behind.

Tuesday, May 18, 12:30 PM EDT – 1 PM EDT. Registration.

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Lecture: “Post-Discipline: Literature, Professionalism, and the Crisis of the Humanities” (Merve Emre, Oxford University)

Dahlem Humanities Center, Free University Berlin

Post-Discipline asks how (and if) literary scholars should think with and against the innovators of the professional-managerial classes and their deterritorialization of literary pedagogy. Emre’s talk provides an overview of both halves of her book. The first half interrogates why and how narrative fiction is used in schools of professional education to cultivate virtues like leadership, empathy, and judiciousness. The second half imagines how earlier myths and models of literary study, which institute the study of comparative philology, grammar, and taste-making as part of literary professionalization and pedagogy, might point us toward different futures for the discipline

Wednesday, May 19, 06:15 PM CET. Registration.

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Book Launch: “Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought,” by Tae-Yeoun Keum (UC Santa Barbara)

Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, UC Santa Barbara

Tae-Yeoun Keum argues that myth is neither irrelevant nor inimical to the ideal of rational progress. She tracks the influence of Plato’s dialogues through the early modern period and on to the twentieth century, showing how pivotal figures in the history of political thought—More, Bacon, Leibniz, the German Idealists, Cassirer, and others—have been inspired by Plato’s mythmaking. She finds that Plato’s followers perennially raised the possibility that there is a vital role for myth in rational political thinking.

Thursday, May 20, 4:00-4:45 pm PST. Registration.

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Conference: Political Concepts: Graduate Student Edition

Cogut Institute for the Humanities, Brown University

The Spring 2021 edition of Political Concepts at Brown invites the featured graduate speakers and the conference participants more broadly to generate and rethink concepts from the positions of the student. The conference addresses a moment of crisis indicated in the U.S. by the failure to contain the coronavirus pandemic, sustained state violence against Black Americans, and increasingly active White supremacist movements. Proposed as early as April of last year, all the concepts to be discussed from across the humanities and social sciences link the structural conditions of, as well as the persistence of popular resistance to, this crisis.

May 20-22, 11:00 am – 3:00 pm EDT. Registration.


Featured Image: Boris Kustodiev, 1926. Courtesy of WikiArt.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Public Conversation: Sensoriality and Kinship in Prison Lifeworlds: A Conversation with Mahuya Bandyopadhyay and Vijay Raghavan

Carceral Imaginary Working Group at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University

Two scholars who have worked in prison spaces in India for decades reflect on how these de-humanizing spaces hold up what it means to be human.

Tuesday, April 27, 2021 – 9:30am to 11:00am EST. Registration.

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Symposium: Reconfiguring Histories Symposium

Harvard Graduate School of Design; Harvard Indigenous Design Collective

This symposium initiates critical conversations between artists, activists, and scholars working on museum discourse related to institutionalized knowledge with a focus on provenance, narrative, decolonial curatorial praxis, and community engagement.

Wednesday, April 28, 2021 at 12 PM EDT. Registration.

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Conference: On the Possibility and Impossibility of Reparations for Slavery and Colonialism, Panel: “Colonial Reckoning”

Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, Columbia University

Cresa Pugh (Harvard University) “The Afterlife of Cultural Death: On the Promise of Restitution for the Benin Bronzes” Lyndsey Beutin (McMaster University) “’Slavery in Africa’ and Other Tired Tropes: How Anti-trafficking Rhetoric Undermines Reparations Organizing”
Roseline Armange (University of Michigan) “Racial Terminology, Positionality, and Reparations in the Francophone Caribbean”
Discussant: Laura Bini Carter (GC, CUNY)

Wednesday April 28th; 1-3pm EDT. Registration.

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Lecture: “The Unforgiven: Wagner, Jews, and Antisemitism” (Alex Ross, The New Yorker)

Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism, Yale Germanic Languages and Literatures, and Whitney Humanities Center.

Wednesday, April 28, 5 pm EST. Registration.

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Lecture: “The Critical Posthumanities,” (Rose Braidotti, Utrecht University)

Center for Culture and Technology, University of Southern Denmark; Danish Institute for Advanced Study

Thursday, April 29 at 12 PM EDT – 2 PM CEST. Registration.

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Lecture: Lefler Lecture, “Voices of the Enslaved” (Sophie White, University of Notre Dame)

Carleton University

Professor White’s newest book, Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Louisiana (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture/University of North Carolina Press, 2019) foregrounds an exceptional set of source material about slavery in French America: court cases in which enslaved individuals testified and in the process produced riveting autobiographical narratives.

Tuesday, May 4, 12:25 – 1:25 pm, EDT. Registration.

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Public Conversation: “Sacralizing Money,” with Eugene McCarraher, Bethany Moreton, Devin Singh, Russell Muirhead and Amy Schiller

The Leslie Center for the Humanities, Dartmouth College

Participants explore different perspectives on the presence of intimacy, virtue, and mysticism in financial transactions, and the ramifications of a more expansive framework for money amidst upheaval in the capitalist and neoliberal regimes.

Wednesday, May 5, 4:00–6:00pm EDT. Link.

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Public Conversation: Thinking Women: New Books Series
Indian Sex Life: Sexuality and the Colonial Origins of Modern Social Thought” by Durba Mitra, moderated by Anjali Arondekar

University of California, Irvine School of the Humanities

Wednesday, May 5, 12:00-1:00pm PDT. Registration.

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Lecture: “Fantasizing Racism” (Todd McGowan, University of Vermont)

The Leslie Center for the Humanities, Dartmouth College

In this talk, McGowan will argue for the enduring relevance of the psychoanalytic logic of fantasy for antiracist critical practice.

Thursday, May 6, 4:00 – 5:15pm EDT. Registration.


Featured Image: Paul Signac, Still Life with a Book. 1883. Courtesy of Wikiart.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Lecture: “A Temporal Turn: Rethinking German-Jewish Intellectual History with Buber, Benjamin, Arendt, and Celan” (Nitzan Lebovic, Lehigh University)
Commentator: Benjamin Pollock

The Richard Koebner Center for German History, Hebrew University

A German Jewish Time tells the story of a group of twentieth-century Jewish intellectuals who grappled ceaselessly with concepts of time and temporality. The project brings into dialogue key thinkers, including the philosopher of religion Martin Buber, the critical theorist Walter Benjamin, the political scientist Hannah Arendt, and the poet Paul Celan, who stand at the center of our contemporary understanding of religion, critical theory, politics, and literature.

Sunday, April 11, 2021, 18:30-20:00 in Israel. Link for Event.

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Conference: A (Virtual) Conversation on the Plantationocene

Cross-Border Movements Program on Migrations at Cornell University, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Cornell’s Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies.

This set of virtual panels brings together a diverse group of scholars, activists, and practitioners to discuss the role that plantations and plantation agriculture have played in shaping the nature, structure and dynamics of the modern era.

Thursday, April 15, 2021 More dates through April 16. Registration.

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Lecture: “Jackie Kay’s Intermedial Poetics – Disjunctive Connectivity and Plural Identities” (Prof. Dr. Birgit Neumann, Heinrich Heine University of Duesseldorf)

Vrije Universiteit Brussel Faculty of Arts and Philosophy

Thursday 22 April 2021 09:00h – 10:30h (Brussels). Registration.

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Lecture: “Social Networks of the Past. Mapping Hispanic and Lusophone Modernity through Literary Translation in Periodicals” (Laura Fólica, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

Vrije Universiteit Brussel Faculty of Arts and Philosophy

Monday 17 May, 11-12:30 (Brussels). Registration.

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Call for Papers: Connections: A Journal of Language, Media, and Culture

Connections: A Journal of Language, Media, and Culture invites high-quality research submissions for their 2021 publication. Connections is committed to elevating and supporting graduate-level and early-career research from interdisciplinary subject areas. Our second issue will center on the theme of building bridges: maintaining connections found at the heart of cultural, multimedia, textual, or language-based interactions in times of crisis. Building bridges in times of crisis may look like community-building, resilience, protest, growth, or care work. We hope this theme will allow for nuanced interpretation.

Please submit before May 15, 2021.

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Call for Papers: Massachusetts Historical Review: Representation in American History

Interested parties should submit a current curriculum vitae along with a one-page (double-spaced) proposal that outlines the subject the author seeks to pursue and its connection to the theme, the sources employed, and the intervention in relevant historical scholarship to mhr@masshist.org by June 15, 2021. By July 15, 2021, authors with successful proposals will receive an invitation to submit a completed draft of their essay for consideration. First drafts of essays selected will be due by December 1, 2021, and must be 7,500–10,000 words. All drafts will undergo a rigorous peer-review process by both MHS staff and outside readers prior to publication.

Due by June 15


Featured Image: Mary Cassatt, Reading the Newspaper, No.2. c. 1883. Courtesy of the Art Institute Chicago.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Webinar: “Black and Indigenous Futures”

Organized by the Society of Black Archaeologists
April 7th, 2021, at 4:00pm – 6:00pm EDT

In this final webinar of the series, archaeologists, artists, and cultural theorists turn to questions of what’s next in the struggle for the recognition and promotion of Indigenous and Black life. They ask: How can archaeology, the study of material worlds past and present, help construct new futures? This work will include recognizing the ongoing experiences of cultural genocide and how to sustain ancestral homelands while cultivating new ones for diasporas always in the making. We will explore the intersection of Black and Indigenous communities in the continued fight for justice.

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Lecture: “Fanon on the Matter of Breathing,” Achille Mbembe (WiSER, Wits University)

Wednesday, April 7, 6PM (Johannesburg time)

From February to October of 2021, WiSER’s PUBLIC POSITIONS Series will present ten public thematic dialogues on the new generation of Fanon studies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the political and the clinical, the close communication between the two, how they impact upon one another and are at times mistaken for each other. Speakers are invited to develop one or more arguments for 20 minutes each. This will be followed by a dialogue led by Professor Achille Mbembe before the session is opened to a broader audience.

Registration here.

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CfP: “Narratives of Temporality: Continuities, Discontinuities, Ruptures”

Conference organised by the London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research, to take place July 24-25, 2021 at Cambridge/Online.

The aim of this conference is to develop a multidisciplinary reflection on the complex relationship between narrative and temporality. The central topics concern the multiple and articulated ways in which narrative practices and forms of temporality dynamically interact, by developing a multifaceted space of concepts, theories, practices and knowledge, in a dynamics of cross-disciplinary thinking. Full CfP here.

Proposals up to 250 words should be sent by April 30, 2021 to spatiality.temporality@lcir.co.uk.

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CfP: “Plague, politics, and portents,” Ars Longa Journal

Ars Longa is a new, independent online journal and blog dedicated to Early Modern art and visual/material culture. The aim is to create an open-access, creative platform where early career scholars and advanced graduate students can share their research and current projects. For our inaugural issue, we welcome submissions related—but not limited—to the following topics: epidemics, plagues, and sickness; prophesies, omens and portents; marvels, wonders, and prodigies; eschatology; flood, famine, and other natural disasters; memento mori, memorials, and mourning; political upheaval, uprisings, revolts, and war. Read the full call here.

For consideration, please send your abstract (250 words) along with a CV to arslongajournal at gmail.com by April 15, 2021.

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CfP: “Liberalism and/or socialism: tensions, exchanges and convergences from the 19th century to today”

Conference organized by the University of Lorraine – Nancy (France), to take place October 21–22, 2021.

This conference aims at reevaluating the relationship between two major ideologies—liberalism and socialism—which seem to be contested nowadays, exploring the forms they have taken and tracing their development from their rise in the 19th century onward. Papers that address the interactions between socialism and liberalism in the English-speaking world (Ireland, UK, US etc.) , in the fields of intellectual history, the history of political and economic thought, economic and political history are welcome. Read the full call here.

Proposals (300 words max) and a short biography should be sent to liberalism.socialism.conference@gmail.com and stephane.guy@univ-lorraine.fr by May 10, 2021.

CfP: “Dynamic Encounters between Buddhism and the West”
University of Cambridge Postgraduate Online Conference 21-22 June 2021


This conference seeks to explore historical and contemporary dialogues between Buddhism and the West, while also contemplating ways of opening up new conversations. With an appreciation of the value of interdisciplinarity, we aim to bring together scholars from diverse fields to both share and enhance their unique perspectives. In today’s era of globalisation, dialogue between different cultures is a daily occurrence. The last century in particular has produced a dynamic exchange of ideas between Buddhism and the West. Important exchanges have occurred in myriad areas of intellectual life, ranging from spiritual endeavours to the pursuit of a scientific understanding of the mind.

Please send abstract (500 words) and CV to: dynamicencounters2021@gmail.com by 9 May 2021.


Featured Image: Rik Wouters, “Woman in Black Reading a Newspaper,” 1912.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Book Talk: “Ecosemiotics,” by Timo Maran (Tartu University)

Maran will present his new book Ecosemiotics: The Study of Signs in Changing Ecologies (Cambridge University Press, 2020) in the Greenhouse book talk series, an environmental humanities research group at the University of Stavanger.

March 15, 4:00pm CET. Register.

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Lecture: “A Precarious Happiness: Adorno on Negativity and Normativity,” by Peter Gordon (Harvard)

It is a commonplace view that Adorno subscribes to a doctrine of “epistemic negativism,” or “austere negativism.” On this interpretation, Adorno denies that we can have any knowledge of the good, since our society is wholly false. Gordon’s talk offers, first, some arguments against this commonplace reading of Adorno’s work and, second, proposes an alternative explanation for the normativity that underwrites his criticism. Hosted by UC Berkeley’s Program in Critical Theory.

March 15, 5:00 – 7:00pm PST. Register.

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Lecture: “The Archive of the Anthropocene: The Nature of Political Documents and the Role of Documents in Politics of Nature,” by Kristin Asdal

Part of Welcome to the Anthropocene, an interdisciplinary lecture series organized by the Oslo School of Environmental Humanities where leading scholars at UiO ask how the age of the “Anthropocene” has transformed their discipline and research.

March 16, 4:15-5:15pm CET. Register.

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Lecture: Sunlight and Silver: Celluloid Materialities and the Making of Ferrania Film,” by Elena Past (Wayne State University)

The talk unravels the material and energetic forces that converge in the history of FILM Ferrania, an iconic Italian celluloid producer beloved by renowned auteurs including Pasolini, Fellini, and Antonioni. FILM Ferrania began its industrial life as SIPE (Società Italiana Prodotti Esplodenti), an explosives manufacturer which made gunpowder for the Russian military. With the Soviet revolution in 1918, Ferrania lost its primary client, but soon discovered that the large stockpile of nitrocellulose used to make explosives could be converted to produce celluloid film. As a film production factory, Ferrania, like Kodak, made intense use of primary materials (like camphor, silver, and cellulose) and industrial chemicals, and the facility discarded and exhaled waste, toxic and otherwise. In 2010, as digital photography captured an increasingly large market share, Ferrania, which had enabled generations of filmmakers to write with light, turned theirs off. The project considers questions including: where does analog film culture reside in the digital age, or in other words, what are the material legacies of sunlight and silver? Hosted by the Centre for Culture and Ecology, Durham University.

March 18, 4:00pm UTC+01. Register.

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Workshop: “Gendered Necropower: Abolition Feminism and Black Death’s Public Private Divide,” with Shatema Threadcraft (Dartmouth)

Part of the 14th Feminist Theory Workshop 2021 Virtual Series. Since 2007, The Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University has hosted an annual Feminist Theory Workshop (FTW). FTW 2021 will bring us together virtually on Feminist Theory Fridays – three Friday afternoons in March when scholars share their work.

March 19, 2:00 – 3:30am EST. Register.

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Lecture: “Language, the Liberal Arts and the Challenges of the 21st Century,” by Noam Chomsky

The Humanities Center at the University of San Diego is proud to welcome Noam Chomsky, PhD, as the Knapp chair of liberal arts 2021. In conversation with Thomas Reifer, professor of sociology, Chomsky will discuss the question of language as part of the inquiry into what sort of creatures we are and the role of the liberal arts in helping us to confront humanity’s urgent 21st century challenges.

March 22, 6:00-7:00pm PT. Register.

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Lecture: “Touche-touche,” by Jean-Luc Nancy

This lecture series takes queer theory’s conversation about intimacy as a starting point to discuss some of its cultural possibilities, mediated forms, and philosophical trajectories in the context of Corona.

March 24, 7:00pm CET. Register.

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Talk: “The Eighth Continent: Lunar Enclosures in the Twenty-First Century Race for the Moon,” by Tamara Álvarez

In the context of a Moon race where multiple actors are rushing to get hold of limited resources located in a reduced area, several international fora and working groups have been created to regulate the occupation of these lunar regions and the exploitation of their resources. In this lecture, Tamara Álvarez examines the ways in which these regulatory practices are advancing the three-dimensional enclosure of the Moon’s land, underground and radiospectrum, and setting the basis for a lunar private property regime.

March 24, 2:00-3:30pm EST. Register.

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Lecture: “Columbus and Islam,” by Alan Mikhail (Yale University)

Christopher Columbus lived the vast majority of his life in a Mediterranean world in which the Ottoman and Mamluk Empires dominated the eastern part of the sea and were in constant economic, political, and confrontational interaction with the Christian states of Europe. This talk considers the importance of Islam in shaping Columbus’s life and voyages. In doing so, it thinks critically about the role of Islam in the Spanish decision to send him across the ocean and in the early history of the Spanish Caribbean. It furthermore uses this Muslim history of Columbus to suggest ways of analyzing early modern periodization and the place of Islam in the making of the modern world. Part of the Franke Program in Science & the Humanities Distinguished Speaker Series.

March 24, 4:00pm EST. Register.

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Seminar: “Intertidal PlastiCity”

The seminar will revolve around two projects that follow the plastics and marine life that inhabit the Mumbai’s intertidal habitat. The films and photos of these research projects are now available at inhabitedsea.org. We invite you to dwell in these projects before joining the live conversation between Naveen Namboothri and Lindsay Bremner about rethinking life in Intertidal PlastiCities. The presentations will be followed by a closing conversation between Dilip da Cunha, Anuradha Mathur and the project leads that will reflect on the aspirations and outcomes of Inhabited Sea.

March 24, 9:00am EST. Register.

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Conference: “Decolonising Archives, Rethinking Canons: Writing Intellectual Histories of Global Entanglements”

Supported by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Cambridge

The aim of this conference is hinged on two primary concerns: One is of bringing to the fore works in intellectual history and political thought, framed by both context specificity and vernacular sources. The second important goal is to question the equivocal process of canonization and bring together scholars working on non-canonical intellectual traditions, texts, and figures.

March 26-28. Register either for individual panels or for the full conference.

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CfP: “Narratives of Temporality: Continuities, Discontinuities, Ruptures”

Organised by the London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research, to take place 24-25 July 2021 – Cambridge/Online.

The aim of this conference is to develop a multidisciplinary reflection on the complex relationship between narrative and temporality. The central topics concern the multiple and articulated ways in which narrative practices and forms of temporality dynamically interact, by developing a multifaceted space of concepts, theories, practices and knowledge, in a dynamics of cross-disciplinary thinking. Full CfP here.

Proposals up to 250 words should be sent by 30 April 2021 to spatiality.temporality@lcir.co.uk.

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CfP: “Plague, politics, and portents,” Ars Longa Journal

Ars Longa is a new, independent online journal and blog dedicated to Early Modern art and visual/material culture. The aim is to create an open-access, creative platform where early career scholars and advanced graduate students can share their research and current projects. For our inaugural issue, we welcome submissions related—but not limited—to the following topics: epidemics, plagues, and sickness; prophesies, omens and portents; marvels, wonders, and prodigies; eschatology; flood, famine, and other natural disasters; memento mori, memorials, and mourning; political upheaval, uprisings, revolts, and war. Read the full call here.

For consideration, please send your abstract (250 words) along with a CV to arslongajournal at gmail.com by April 15, 2021.


Featured Image: Honore Daumier, “Coucou! le revoila,” 1870.

Categories
News and Events

Intellectual History News and Events

With the proliferation of online lectures, working groups and all manner of events, we at the JHI Blog thought it would be a good idea to consolidate news and opportunities relevant to our colleagues working in intellectual history. We will publish these roundups of public lectures, conferences, calls for papers, working groups and new journal issues every other Saturday.

We encourage our readers to send us information and updates about any news or events that fits within this scope. You can use this form to let us know about something you’d like us to publicize.


Discussion: “Who Needs a Worldview? Raymond Geuss in Conversation”

Brooklyn Institute for Social Research faculty Ajay Singh Chaudhary, Michael Stevenson, and Rebecca Ariel Porte will welcome world-renowned philosopher Raymond Geuss for a wide-ranging discussion of Geuss’s most recent book Who Needs a Worldview? (Harvard).

The event is free to attend and will stream live to the BISR Facebook page.

February 28, 2:00pm EST. Sign up.

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Panel: “Health, Disease, and Early American Environments”

This panel discussion brings together the histories of health, disease, and the environment to cast new light on key sites of Colonial American history. With authors Molly Nebiolo (Northeastern University) and Camden Elliott (Harvard University), commentary by Thomas Wickman (Trinity College). Part of the Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar.

March 2, 5:15 – 6:30pm EST. Register.

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Lecture: “Microhistory and Global History,” with Carlo Ginzburg

The Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies has invited internationally renowned historian Carlo Ginzburg to reflect on his pioneering research in conversation with historian Francesca Trivellato of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study. The discussion will touch on the relationship between micro-history and global history, the relevance of Ginzburg’s work for the study of the Jews and marginalized others, the intersections between his life and his work, and the nature of the historian’s craft, among other topics that have been illumined by Ginzburg’s fecund and capacious intellect.

March 2, 12:00 – 1:30pm EST. Register.

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Book Launch: Adorno and the Ban on Images, by Sebastian Truskolaski (KCL)

Virtual launch of a new monograph exploring the recurrence of the Old Testament interdiction against image-making in Adorno’s writings, recently published by Bloomsbury Academic. The author will be in conversation with Dr Cat Moir (Germanic Studies, Sydney). Part of KCL’s Comparative Literature research seminar series. 

March 3, 5:30pm UTC+01. Register.

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Presentation: “The Dark Green: FIRE,” by Heather Sullivan (Trinity University)

The “dark green” project focuses on narratives revealing plant-human relationships that enable and cultivate human cultures but also the darkly petroleum-fueled industrialization, mass species extinctions, and strange new ecosystems in the Anthropocene allowed by rotted plants in the form of oil, coal, and methane gas. In this talk based on the “FIRE” chapter of the book, the author focuses on literary and scientific explorations of plant-based energy forms as well the many meanings of fire broadly for human culture particularly in the Anthropocene, or the era since the industrial revolution.

Hosted by the Centre for Culture and Ecology, Durham University.

March 4, 7:00pm UTC+01. Register.

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Talk: “Sovversivismo: Gramsci on Reactionary Insurrections,” by Roberto Dainotto

Can a popular insurrection “from below,” passionately fought again constituted power, be the expression of the most reactionary of politics? That was the question that the “fascist revolution” had posed for Antonio Gramsci. The presentation examines Gramsci’s changing attitudes towards sovversivismo, or “subversiveness.” Hosted by the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University.

March 5, 9:30 – 1:00am EST. Register.

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Film Screening: “I’m No Longer Here” (dir. Fernando Frias)

Join the Spring 2021 Lang Philosophy Film Club series. Everyone with an interest in philosophy, film, and/or convivial conversation about the meaning of what we experience is invited. Each screening will begin and conclude with a discussion facilitated by a member of the NSSR Philosophy Department.

March 5, 7:00 – 10:00pm EST. Register.

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Talk: “Entangled Nuclear Colonialisms, Matters of Force, and the Material Force of Justice,” by Karen Barad (UCSC)

In this talk, Karen Barad will expand upon their pathbreaking article “After the End of the World” (Theory & Event, 2019), which states that “quantum theory is shot through with the political.” In order to demonstrate, in relation to the theme of composite bodies, the highly political nature of not only our modes of meaning making, but of matter, they will outline the socio-political dimensions of their agential realist reworking of quantum physics and will briefly discuss the political nature of matter, followed by a discussion of the article and its implications for notions of justice.

March 10, 5:00pm. Register.

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Lecture: “The Great Departure: Mass Migration and Freedom,” by Tara Zahra (University of Chicago)

Hosted by the Miami University Humanities Center, co-sponsored by the Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies.

March 11, 5:00pm. Join via Zoom.

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Colloquium: “Feminized Labor, Sex Work and Precarity”
With Annie McClanahan (UC-Irvine) and Jon-David Settell (UC-Irvine)

This meeting will center around discussion of a paper from Annie McClanahan and Jon-David Settell entitled “Service Work, Sex Work, and the “Prostitute Imaginary.’” It’s the second of three events in a semester-long series of programming addressing the capacious theme “racial capitalism and crisis” Attendees can download the paper here and should read it in advance of the colloquium.

March 11, 12:30-2:00pm. Register.

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Lecture: “Thinking with Adorno: Metaphysical Experience and Aesthetic Autonomy,” by Henry Pickford (Duke)

In the spring of 1969, when Germany was convulsed by popular unrest and police violence, the editor of the German magazine Der Spiegel begins his interview with the philosopher and sociologist Theodor W. Adorno by saying “Professor Adorno, two weeks ago, the world still seemed in order,” to which Adorno responds, “Not to me.” The interview concludes with Adorno asserting, “I am not in the least ashamed to say very publicly that I am working on a major book on aesthetics.”

While Adorno submitted the oppressive tendencies of modern western society to withering critique, his practice as a public intellectual as well as his philosophy also seek to develop capacities of resistance and hope. The talk offers an account of some of these capacities, centering on two concepts advanced by Adorno: metaphysical experience and the riddle-character of modernist art.

March 12, 9:30-11:00am. Register.


Featured Image: Juan Gris, “Fruit Bowl, Book and Newspaper.”