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What We're Reading

What We’re Reading: Week of Jan. 19

Here are a few interesting articles and pieces we found around the web this week. If you come across something that other intellectual historians might enjoy, please let us know in the comments!

Madeline:

Nina Martyris, Auden, Rabelais and Charlie Hebdo (LARB)

Erik Kwakkel, Medieval Apps (Medieval Books)

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts (Free online course starting this week; Stanford University)

Thony Christie, 10 Great History of (European) Science Books (Science Book A Day)

James Blackburn, What the Huguenots Carried (New York History Blog)

Melia Robinson, Big History in Action (Business Insider)

Nigel Leask, Rabbie Burns reborn (TLS)

Emily:

Robert Crawford, Lithe Pale Girls (LRB)

Stephen Sedley, I have no books to consult (LRB)

Marilynne Robinson, On Edgar Allan Poe (NYRB)

Marc Santora, Couple Ending a 3-Decade Journey in Travel Book Sales (NY Times)

Robinson Meyer, How Gothic Architecture Took over the College Campus (The Atlantic)

Carol Pogash, To Some Indians in California, Father Serra is Far From a Saint (NY Times)

Jill Lepore, What the Web Said Yesterday (New Yorker)

Rebecca Spence, Emma Goldman Papers Project in Danger of Being Shut Down (Jewish Journal)

Faramerz Dabhoiwala, The Secret History of Same-sex Marriage (The Guardian)

And, not least, the funniest thing on television today, a sitcom about Edwardian suffragettes (BBC – UK IP address required)

John:

“Of Nation-States and the United States: An Interview with Ryan Irwin” (Toynbee Prize Foundation: Global History Forum)

Jürg Altwegg, »Ein Kongress der Weißwäscher?« (FAZ)

Peter Bürger, »Erzählfreude statt Realismus« (Neue Zürcher Zeitung)

Richard Brody, “The Virtues of Screening ‘Forbidden’ Films” (The New Yorker blog)

Don Harrán, “Salamone Rossi as a Jew among Gentiles” (OUP blog)

Julia M. Klein, “Less is More” (The Nation)

Pankaj Mishra, “After the Paris Attacks: It’s Time for a New Enlightenment” (The Guardian)

Helmut Mörchen, »Die Erfindung des europäischen Intellektuellen« (Deutschlandrundfunk)

Samuel Moyn, “Bonfire of the Humanities” (The Nation)

François Rastier, « Antisémitisme : l’heideggérisme après le naufrage » (Le Nouvel Observateur)

And finally, Charles S. Maier’s open lecture course, “World War and Society in the Twentieth Century: World War II” (courtesy of Harvard Extension School’s Open Learning Initiative)

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What We're Reading

What We’re Reading: Week of Jan. 12

Here are a few interesting articles and pieces we found around the web this week. If we missed something that other intellectual historians might enjoy, please let us know in the comments!

John:

Roberto Gilodi, Germania anno zero (Doppiozero)

Jeet Heer, Found in Translation (The New Republic)

Grégoire Leménager, Comment Voltaire a écrit “le Traité sur la tolerance (Le Nouvel Observateur)

Lili Loofbourow, The End of Power by Moises Naím review – a study in mass alienation (The Guardian)

Samuel Moyn, Fantasies of Federalism (Dissent Magazine)

Florence Vychytil-Baudoux, Les trajectoires de la diaspora (La Vie des idées)

Michael Walser, Islamism and the West (Dissent Magazine)

Robert Zaretsky, It’s the Emotions, Stupid (The Los Angeles Review of Books)

Dipesh Chakrabarty, “From Globalization to Global Warming: A Historiographical Transition” (video; Toynbee Prize lecture)

Madeline:

Robert Darnton, Laughter and Terror (NYRB)

Donna Zuckerberg, The Authorial Lie (Medium)

Paul Needham, The Gutenberg Bible (Cambridge University Library)

Fraser McNair, Becoming a Lord in Three Easy Steps (Doing History in Public)

Olivier Tonneau, On Charlie Hebdo: A Letter to my British Friends (MediaPart)

Upcoming Deadline for “Philology Among the Disciplines” seminar in Rome (Notre Dame)

Emily:

Katherine Angel, Gender, blah, blah, blah (LARB)

Robert Darnton, Laughter and Terror (NYRB)

Adam Shatz, Moral Clarity (LRB)

Jonathan Goodwin, Jobs of the MLA (jgoodwin.net)

Erik Morse and Lara Delage-Toriel, A Portrait of the Young Girl: On the 60th Anniversary of Lolita (LARB)

Natalia Nowakowska, Dolphins in the Bodleian (Somerville Historian)

Jan Goldstein, 2015 Annual Meeting Presidental Address (video; AHA)

Matthew Reisz, British Library Unveils Eight-year Plan (THE)

Margalit Fox, Al Bendich, Defender of ‘Howl’ and Lenny Bruce’s Comedy, Is Dead at 85 (NYT)

Tom Cutterham, Do Ideas Have Roots? (The Junto)

And, not least, Mallory Ortberg, Women Listening to Men Play Music in Western Art History (The Toast)

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What We're Reading

What We’re Reading: Week of Jan. 5

Here are a few interesting articles and pieces we found around the web this week. If we missed something that other intellectual historians might enjoy, please let us know in the comments!

Maddy:

The Attack on Charlie Hebdo and the Tradition of Parisian Wit [NY Times]

John:

Vanni Bianconi, “Esseri architettonici ed umani” [Doppiozero]

Phoebe Maltz Bovy, “Straight Outta Chappaqua” [Tablet]

“Wartime Life: Right to Write” [The Economist]

Anthony Grafton, “Reliving the Renaissance” [ NYRB]

Rolf Hosfeld with Christoph Heinemann, “Er konnte in kleinen Dingen Symptome Sehen” [Deutschlandfunk]

Andreas Isenschmid, “Der unerhörte Glanz von Paris” [Zeit]

François Jarrige, “E.P. Thompson, un vie de combat” [La vie des idées]

Thomas Kaufmann, “Gespenstische Bilder” [Süddeutsche Zeitung]

Jennifer Schluessler, “Literature of India, Enshrined in a Series” [NY Times]

Marc Zitzman, “Wie mächtig sind Ideen?” [Neue Zürcher Zeitung]

Paul Buhle and Nick Thorkelson, “You Had to Be There: George Moss in Comics” [Jewish Daily Forward]

Emily:

‘Ferguson Did Not Happen in a Vacuum’ (about an AHA panel on Ferguson) [Chronicle]

The New Modesty in Literary Criticism [Chronicle]

Excerpt from David Konstan, Beauty: The Fortunes of a Greek Idea [Salon]

Terence Ranger and the Jagged Geometry of Zimbabwe [The Con]

Philosophy from the Outside In [Cultural History of Philosophy Blog, QMUL]

George Mosse Finds Himself in Comics [Jewish Daily Forward]

Categories
What We're Reading

What We’re Reading: Week of Dec. 29

Here are the editors’ picks from around the internet this week. Please add other pieces of interest to intellectual historians in the comments section!

“Not an institution, but a little community”: T.F. Tout and the ‘Manchester School’ (misplacedhabits)

David Bell on The New Republic (Los Angeles Review of Books)

Tenured Radical’s guide to NYC and the AHA (Tenured Radical)

And last but not least, Top Ten Looks for Your AHA Interview (Historista)