What We’re Reading: Week of Jan. 12

Here are a few interesting articles and pieces we found around the web this week. If we missed something that other intellectual historians might enjoy, please let us know in the comments!

John:

Roberto Gilodi, Germania anno zero (Doppiozero)

Jeet Heer, Found in Translation (The New Republic)

Grégoire Leménager, Comment Voltaire a écrit “le Traité sur la tolerance (Le Nouvel Observateur)

Lili Loofbourow, The End of Power by Moises Naím review – a study in mass alienation (The Guardian)

Samuel Moyn, Fantasies of Federalism (Dissent Magazine)

Florence Vychytil-Baudoux, Les trajectoires de la diaspora (La Vie des idées)

Michael Walser, Islamism and the West (Dissent Magazine)

Robert Zaretsky, It’s the Emotions, Stupid (The Los Angeles Review of Books)

Dipesh Chakrabarty, “From Globalization to Global Warming: A Historiographical Transition” (video; Toynbee Prize lecture)

Madeline:

Robert Darnton, Laughter and Terror (NYRB)

Donna Zuckerberg, The Authorial Lie (Medium)

Paul Needham, The Gutenberg Bible (Cambridge University Library)

Fraser McNair, Becoming a Lord in Three Easy Steps (Doing History in Public)

Olivier Tonneau, On Charlie Hebdo: A Letter to my British Friends (MediaPart)

Upcoming Deadline for “Philology Among the Disciplines” seminar in Rome (Notre Dame)

Emily:

Katherine Angel, Gender, blah, blah, blah (LARB)

Robert Darnton, Laughter and Terror (NYRB)

Adam Shatz, Moral Clarity (LRB)

Jonathan Goodwin, Jobs of the MLA (jgoodwin.net)

Erik Morse and Lara Delage-Toriel, A Portrait of the Young Girl: On the 60th Anniversary of Lolita (LARB)

Natalia Nowakowska, Dolphins in the Bodleian (Somerville Historian)

Jan Goldstein, 2015 Annual Meeting Presidental Address (video; AHA)

Matthew Reisz, British Library Unveils Eight-year Plan (THE)

Margalit Fox, Al Bendich, Defender of ‘Howl’ and Lenny Bruce’s Comedy, Is Dead at 85 (NYT)

Tom Cutterham, Do Ideas Have Roots? (The Junto)

And, not least, Mallory Ortberg, Women Listening to Men Play Music in Western Art History (The Toast)

One comment

  1. So I was struck, reading the wonderful Somerville Historian post on Aldus, by the question: can blogging accomplish some of the particular kinds of intellectual work demanded by Zuckerberg?

    Like

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