Days of Letters in the Republic

It’s our pleasure to announce a new feature here at the JHI website. If you look above and to the side, you’ll find a new calendar collecting various happenings in the Republic of Letters. Our hope here matches what we feel about intellectual history: the calendar looks all over the world (or for the time being, at least the places the editors know fairly well) and highlights events we feel will prove of general interest to intellectual historians and others. This includes conferences, public lectures, and workshops as much as museum exhibitions, gallery showings, film festivals and more. This is a work-in-progress, but we look forward to tinkering with it and adding content from here on out.

So please take a peek and also keep an eye out: you can likely find one or the other of the editors and our contributors in attendance. Say hello if you should bump into us! We also welcome suggestions and reviews for events at blogjhi@gmail.com or @jhideas on Twitter: please keep us posted on interesting happenings for intellectual historians all over the world. (This also certainly includes events in other languages!) The calendar will be updated monthly, so the more advance notice given the better.

In other news, the JHI editors attended the annual Arthur O. Lovejoy lecture in Philadelphia this last weekend. You can see a record of our live-tweeting Professor Marcia Colish’s fascinating talk “The Boys on the Beach: Children’s Games and Baptismal Grace in Medieval Thought” here (Storify courtesy of L.D. Burnett, another of our heroes). We very much look forward to seeing the lecture in print soon; hopefully Tweets will serve to whet our readers’ interest. And in lieu of a proper post today, please take a peek at editor Madeleine McMahon moonlighting at the New York Society Library’s blog where she discusses Jane Austen’s Emma in early America.

Normal posting resumes again on Wednesday. The editors are also excited to roll out another feature or two shortly, so keep an eye on the website and let us know what you think in the comments section. We look forward to hearing from and now meeting our readers!

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