What We’re Reading: January 28th

Here are a few interesting articles and pieces we found around the web this week. If you come across something that other intellectual historians might enjoy, please let us know in the comments section.

John:

Sarah Al-Matary, « Henri Guillemin, intellectuel réfractaire : Entretien avec Patrick Berthier » (La vie des idées)

Arnauld Chandivert and Claire Ducournau, « L’esprit libre de Richard Hoggart » (La vie des idées)

Marshall Poe interviews Stephen Brockmann on his new book The Writers’ State: Constructing East German Literature, 1945-1959 (New Books in History)

Marshall Poe interviews Matthew L. Jones on his new book Reckoning with Matter: Calculating Machines, Innovation, and Thinking about Thinking from Pascal to Babbage (New Books in History)

Christine Richard, »Peter von Matt: Wie küsst Mann mit 80?« (Die Zeit)

Carlo Rovelli, “This Granular Life” (Aeon)

Niccolò Scaffai, “Le opere di Primo Levi” (Le parole e le cose)

Jörg Scheller, »Unter einem Dach die ganze Welt« (Die Zeit)

Ena Selimovic, “The accumulation of tragedy leads to farce: An Interview with Aleksandar Hemon” (The Balkanist)

Adam Tooze, “What Held Nazi Germany Together? The Aly-Tooze Debate Revisited” (AdamTooze.com)

And finally, Becci Sharp on Laurent Kronental’s photography, “Neglected Utopia: Photographer explores the forgotten modernist estates of Paris” (Creative Boom)

Emily:

Susan Pedersen, Super-shallow-fragile-ego-Trump-UR-atrocious, on the women’s march (LRB)

Duncan Bell, The Anglosphere: new enthusiasm for an old dream (Prospect)

Jennifer Schuessler, Columbia Unearths Its Ties to Slavery (NY Times)

Eleanor Parker, Times and Seasons (A Clerk of Oxford)

Helen McCarthy, Nineteen Thirty-One (LRB Blog)

Alison Light, Diary: Raphael Samuel (LRB)

John Banville, The Strange Genius of the Master (NYRB)

Jonah Miller, To Be Worth Forty Shillings: Early Modern Inequality (LRB)

A one-day conference at the Institute for Historical Research, London: London’s women historians: a celebration and a conversation, March 13, 2017.

Erin:

This week’s NPR program, The Takeaway, had an excellent interview with UT Austin History Professor Daina Ramey Berry on her book, The Price for Their Pound of Flesh.  I wish it had been longer.

Bookseller Brian Cassidy’s recent e-list of books on drugs is great.

I was disappointed not to attend the Diversifying the Digital Historical Records conference, but followed the conversation on Twitter.  It’s worth perusing the Tweets by Bergis Jules, Bethanie Nowiski, and others.

Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO) is now live in Beta! See The Collation blog for the skinny.

Roberta Kwok “Crowdsourcing for Shakespeare” (New Yorker)

Louise Nicholson, “Virginia Dawn Emerges as the star of the NGAS New Galleries” (Apollo Magazine)

Dan Piepenbring, “Mr. Coffee Mansplains and Other News” (The Paris Review – this links out to several other excellent pieces, particularly about the recent uptick in sales of Orwell’s 1984)

Ed Smith, “Selling Rare Books on NYC Sidewalks” (The New Antiquarian)

Eric:

Hugo Drochon, “‘Zombie’ Apocalypse in the West?” (Project Syndicate)

Leslie James, “What lessons on fascism can we learn from Africa’s colonial past?” (Africa is a Country)

Dominic Pettman, “Some Remarks on the Legacy of Madame Francine Descartes” (Public Domain Review)

Pierre Rimbert, “Le mot qui tue” (Le monde diplomatique)

Sarah:

Peter Myers, ‘The Third City,’ (ArchitectureAU)

Susan Pedersen, ‘Super-shallow-fragile-ego-Trump-UR-atrocious,’ (London Review of Books)

Karen Stohr, ‘The New Age of Contempt,’ (New York Times)

Adam Tooze, ‘Goodbye to the American Century,’ (Zeit Online)

Rosemary Wakeman, ‘“The ‘Urban Question’ is Now at the Center of Intellectual Life”: A Conversation with Rosemary Wakeman,’ (Global Urban History Blog)

Disha:

A.S. Hamrah, “All That Counts is Getting to A Normal World” (n+1)

Alena Graedon, “Cesar Aira’s Infinite Footnote to Borges” (The New Yorker)

Helen McCarthy, “Nineteen Thirty-One”  (The London Review of Books)

Carolyn:

Steven Shapin, “Invisible Science” (The Hedgehog Review)

Lorraine Daston, “When Science Went Modern” (The Hedgehog Review … maybe just read the whole issue)

Lorraine Berry, “Bibliomania: The Strange Historyof Compulsive Book Buying” (The Guardian)

Isabel Hull, “The Innocence Campaign” (LRB)

Timothy Garton Ash, “Is Europe Disintegrating?” (NYRB)

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